Intermatic Surge Protector & Cutler-Hammer

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Old 10-28-20, 08:25 AM
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Intermatic Surge Protector & Cutler-Hammer

Hi everyone,
Looking at having an Intermatic IG2240-IMSK Whole House Surge Protection unit installed and had some questions.
From what I've read it looks like I would want the Type 2 SPD configuration for install next to the 200amp Cutler-Hammer breaker box in the basement
I wasn't sure Why though, just that that it seemed the configuration that applied to the 'Load' side and not the 'Line' side (which I took to mean - in the Type 1 SPD would be installed close to the incoming line next to the electric meter. I was hoping someone here might be able to explain a little more why this is preferred and what the advantage is over Type 1 SPD install for residential application ...?

Secondly, on the Intermatic Install Sheet, for the Type 2 install, you also need a 30 amp 2 pole circuit breaker that I'm guessing is How the SPD is connected to both legs of the power and also to serve as additional over-voltage protection (Is that right?).
I believe my Circuit Breaker box is a 40 year old Cutler-Hammer but it doesn't display the name anywhere you can see on the outside of box itself - Only information is some electrical specs : 200 amp, Type CC2200 Issue LL-9437.
I did have a GFCI circuit installed many years ago and it's designation was: CH/CH3
The dual pole circuit breaker I found was a Connecticut Electric CH230 2 pole 30amp, which I think is a good brand that's been around for a long time.

Anyway, I just wanted to check to see if I was on the right track. The electrician I'm working with has not installed the Intermatic brand but has experience with other SPD makes. I told him I would get the everything needed to schedule the install. I asked if he he had any recommendations but he seemed happy to let me do this part.

Also, there were some directions to relocate existing breakers DOWN the box (my Line Voltage wires come in from the top of the Breaker Box) in order to provide maximum surge protection and keep the leads to the SPD as short as possible - which I don't quite understand. Those 2 circuit breaker locations are currently where my Deep-Well Water Pump electric service originates.

Hoping you can provide some clarity to what I've read as the spec & install sheets don't really explain a lot.
Thanks,
greynold99
 

Last edited by greynold99; 10-28-20 at 10:05 AM. Reason: mistake in wording of original post
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Old 10-28-20, 10:07 AM
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Sorry folks - I made a mistake in original post with use of Type 1 & Type 2 SPD Install...
I've corrected so it reads correctly.
Thanks to the Forum for the ability to Edit Posts.
greynold99
 
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Old 10-28-20, 10:35 AM
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Here are my thoughts, and I do a lot of surge testing of various types of electronic equipment, using high power surge generators. I've blown up a lot of TVSS.

Its a multi-prong effort to tame surges. Starting with the pole (or pad) transformer, then your service, then close to the equipment at risk. Along with a low impedance earthing at various points as well.
As far as "in the box" wiring. There is merit in getting the suppressor leads as short as possible. Inductance (lead length) is not good in this area. OTOH, the recurring story of using the downstream circuit positions for TVSS doesn't make sense to me. There is very low R and Z in the buss bar system of a 200A service; there is far more Z in the line drop to the house.
And don't forget to do more than the NEC requires for grounding the neutral. Its very important.
Figure that this TVSS might deal with 90% of the damaging surge, the rest must be done at the appliance/computer, etc. And any deficit in the earthing/bonding/grounding system will cause high common mode transients that the TVSS will not be able to handle.
 
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Old 10-28-20, 11:09 AM
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Around here, we don't see many (any) Type-1 installations. So I stick with a Type-2 installation off a DP 30A breaker. In theory, connected directly to the meter/service will give you a shorter path to ground, but for the types of surges the device is going to protect against, I'm not sure how much it really matters.

Similarly with the breaker position. You want it as close to the service entry as possible, but if it needs to be in spaces 5/7 or 9/11 instead of 1/3, I'm not sure you'll ever notice a difference. It's one of those "all things being equal", the shortest path is best.

Surge protection is somewhere between a science and black magic. The basics are simple, but when you start delving deeper into it, it gets complicated very quickly (as reading Telecom Guy's posts always reminds me)
 
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Old 10-28-20, 03:51 PM
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Secondly, on the Intermatic Install Sheet, for the Type 2 install, you also need a 30 amp 2 pole circuit breaker that I'm guessing is How the SPD is connected to both legs of the power and also to serve as additional over-voltage protection (Is that right?).
No, circuit breakers do not protect from over voltage.
 
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Old 10-29-20, 08:28 PM
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Ok! Read all replies and appreciate your efforts to get me up to speed, though I have to admit I don't understand all the technical aspects of TVSS that Telecom Guy indicated.
While I've gained some insight, I am left with a few more questions. One of which, is Why is a 30amp 2 pole breaker specified for the SPD connection? My normal breakers are 2 pole 20 amp for Water & HVAC service and 50 amp for Range. I wondered why either of those wouldn't be suitable?

Also, I was hoping to get confirmation on the 200 amp breaker box being a Cutler-Hammer type based on the only information on the Type CC2200 Issue LL-9437. displayed on the inside panel. Don't know why they didn't just put 'Cutler-Hammer' with this spec label. Is there another place where the Manufacturer info would be found?
Thanks,
greynold99
 
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Old 10-30-20, 08:32 AM
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Hi again all,
I took the front cover off my breaker box and there was a tag with the Cutler-Hammer Model CH40KKM200

Also a direction to 'Only use Type CH/CH3 Circuit Breakers'... So I think I'm good with getting the Connecticut Electric CH230 2 pole 30 amp breaker for the install.

As far as Where it will be located, it looks like the top Left two spaces will be the easiest to relocate.
That's where my 220volt Deep Well Pump circuit is and there appears to be enough wire and space on the circuit panel to make the move.
On the Right side of the panel is the 2 pole 30 amp circuit for the Dryer and the wires there won't allow relocation easily as they appear to be cut to minimal length.

Shouldn't be any difference then in using the Left upper corner set of breaker positions over the Right upper corner pair?
Thanks,
greynold99
 
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Old 10-30-20, 08:34 AM
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The CC2200 is the main 200A breaker and is for Eaton Cutler Hammer type ECC panel, so your panel should be Cutler Hammer. As for the surge protector, just use the breaker size specified by the manufacturer and don't second guess it.
Eaton CH230 breakerbreakers are readily available without buying a non OEM breaker.
 
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Last edited by pattenp; 10-30-20 at 08:50 AM.
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Old 11-02-20, 09:49 AM
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Grey... the 30A breaker is a balance of fire protection in case of TVSS overload/breakdown vs a hold- in ability to ignore a large surge event.
Unless otherwise not permitted, I like to use a breaker already in use, as an alarm indicator of a tripped state.
 
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