dry cell charging? necessary

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Old 11-05-20, 02:27 PM
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dry cell charging? necessary

Now that the summer yard equipment is put away, do you think it's necessary to put he 20 volt batteries on a charger throughout the winter months.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 02:43 PM
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I would charge them before storing them. It shouldn't hurt them to leave them in the charger.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 03:37 PM
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It depends on type of battery and manufacturer. Per DeWALT: "Fully charge battery before storing for extended periods (longer than 6 months)." https://www.dewalt.com/dewalt-dna/fe...battery-safety
 
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Old 11-05-20, 03:44 PM
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These particular units are for WORX's trimmer. 20V. I keep in the shed.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 03:46 PM
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I've been reading some interesting information that has surprised me. It stated that lithium ion batteries should not be stored in the fully charged state. That goes against what has been a norm on battery storage.

I would keep the batteries inside in a stable temperature environment.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 03:51 PM
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I think I will throw them on the charger perhaps once a month. During the summer I always keep them on the charger 24/7.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 04:42 PM
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How to store... depends.

On one hand you want to charge a lithium battery before really long term storage. All batteries self discharge. Lithium's self discharge very slowly but it still happens. Because they are quite fussy about charging it is critically important that the charger know how many cells are in the pack it's charging. If the pack's voltage drops too low the charger doesn't know if it's charging 5 or 6 cells. For safety the charger won't charge and blinks an error code saying bad battery.

But, Lithium batteries degrade slowly over time. Use them or not and they still slowly die. How fast they die depends on the charge level and temperature (and battery chemistry). The more charge they have stored in them the faster they die. The warmer they are stored the faster they die. So, for really long term storage it's best to store them at a reduced charge level and at cool temperatures.

Consider the batteries in your tool when you first purchased it. The battery was likely made in Asia many months before the tool was ever made. Then the tool sat in a warehouse and in the store before you bought it. They can sit for a long time without charging.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 05:00 PM
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OK so maybe I should store them in the garage, at full charge but not do a periodic charge during the winter.

The warmer they are stored the faster they die. So, for really long term storage it's best to store them at a reduced charge level and at cool temperatures.
So this statement brings back memories. My Mom would always store your typical flashlight battery in the refrigerator. I could never understand that. So one time a supposedly very smart science kind of guy was over and some how the subject came up. I said if that is so (keeping your batteries in the fridge is going make them last longer), how come on a cold winter morning I have hard time staring my car? They both kind of looked at me and were a bit dumb struck and could not answer the question.
Of course now I know it's not comparing apple to apples, but at the time I thought I was so smart. LOL.
 
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Old 11-05-20, 05:49 PM
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When I studied Li_ion cells, they recommend a storage state of charge from 30 to 50%. Much unlike most other chemistries. Li-ion self discharge is so low, that much of the "self-discharge" is actually loss of capacity.
 
 

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