Electrical outlet decreasing power to electrical smoker?

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Old 11-27-20, 12:28 PM
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Electrical outlet decreasing power to electrical smoker?

Weird question. Yesterday I tried smoking a turkey, and the temperature of the smoker only got up to 150-degrees max for the 4 hours. Figured it was a smoker issue, however today I turned it on again, and the GFCI fuse blew. I reset the fuse then the smoker worked fine. Got up to 250-degrees with no problem.

Now to my question...is it possible for an outlet to emit less voltage/energy when the GFCI is about to blow? I'm wondering if the outlet was the issue, and ultimately let to the GFCI blowing.

Hope that makes sense Thanks!
 

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11-27-20, 08:35 PM
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That fact that it tripped a GFI device could indicate a heating element going bad. Usually when the elements go bad they leak or short to ground. That will trip a GFI.
 
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Old 11-27-20, 12:36 PM
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What else may have been on the same circuit?
 
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Old 11-27-20, 05:44 PM
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There's no such thing as a GFI fuse.
It would be a GFI breaker, or outlet.
Own and know how to use a volt ohm meter?
 
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Old 11-27-20, 06:09 PM
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Short of a loose connection on the GFI receptacle, the power is either there or itís not.
my guess is something with the thermostat in the cooker.
 
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Old 11-27-20, 07:33 PM
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A loose connection creates heat and that heat has to go somewhere like melting the receptacle wirenuts or any source of resistance specifically with the high draw of anything with a heating element.
Also a fuse is a one time deal (unless you have renewable fuses and more fuse-links) and can't be "reset"

Check all connections downstream from the electric smoker. Check the metal case for continuity to ground there should be none if any continuity is found the heating element is trash and should be replaced.
 
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Old 11-27-20, 08:35 PM
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That fact that it tripped a GFI device could indicate a heating element going bad. Usually when the elements go bad they leak or short to ground. That will trip a GFI.
 
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Old 11-28-20, 01:18 AM
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If it is in the USA as here in Norway, the terms of fuse and breaker are mixed by many people for them it does the same, so that inaccuracy in terms should not affect the possibility to find the source of the problem.

If we look at it and tries to simplify, we have unit with a heating element and probably some control switch/automatics that we do not know any details about.

We suspect the unit to cause a ground fault.

My first advice would be test the unit on another circuit, (on outlet not connected trough the same breaker or fuse, and not using the same GFCI. If everything now works OK it is probably not the smoker. If it still is a problem we guess on that it is the smoker who needs repair.
 
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Old 11-28-20, 06:00 AM
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Thanks everybody for the help! It definitely wasn't the thermostat, as the turkey breast was only half-cooked after 4 hours. Possibly a heating element issue as mentioned. I'll give the smoker one more try in an outlet with a different GFCI.

I'll add that on the same circuit (though different outlet in the front yard), I do have 2 sets of Christmas lights and 3 Christmas blow-ups running out of 1 outlet. Not sure how much power those take, but that may be overkill and possibly caused the GFCI trip.
 
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Old 11-28-20, 07:15 AM
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Is this a 120 volt or a 120/240 volt smoker?

Might have been operating on a 240 volt circuit with one leg dead (no current as opposed to loose connection; no telltale damaging heat buildup elsewhere). Part of the heating continued to work drawing from the other hot leg but not enough to cook the turkey.
 
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Old 11-28-20, 09:33 AM
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What smoker do you have? My first guess is the temperature was simply set at 150.
 
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Old 11-28-20, 11:01 AM
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Moisture in the connections for the Christmas decorations could cause the GFI to trip.
 
 

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