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Leviton 5262-IGW Can these be used in "residential" settings?

Leviton 5262-IGW Can these be used in "residential" settings?

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  #1  
Old 12-03-20, 05:52 PM
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Leviton 5262-IGW Can these be used in "residential" settings?

I scored a lot of 20 Levition 5262-IGW at a surplus dealer for a steal of a price of $8 for all 20!

They are almost exactly like the ones above but have white face, the back is blue and they have a green ground wire.

My question is what exactly does "Isolated Ground" and "Mounting Means Not Grounded" mean and can I use these as "normal" receptacles in a standard residential setting with plastic junction boxes?

The stores receipt stated Levition 5320-WCP but I did scan the correct box/ barcode at the self checkout isle.

The 5320-WCP are the cheap POS "Quickwire" things so $8 for 20 of those is a good price but $8 for these is like the price of 1 at most places let alone 20 so I scored a major deal!
 
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Old 12-03-20, 06:11 PM
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what exactly does "Isolated Ground" and "Mounting Means Not Grounded" mean
This means ground prong of the receptacle is isolated from mounting bracket (where receptacle screws down).
This is usually used in lab environment to reduce possible noise from grounding. Separate ground wire is run and grounding for metal conduit is isolated.

You can use for residential setup without problem, but also without any advantage.
 
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Old 12-03-20, 08:32 PM
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Doesn't meet NEC because of the requirement to be tamper proof.
 
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Old 12-03-20, 11:13 PM
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This means ground prong of the receptacle is isolated from mounting bracket (where receptacle screws down).
This is usually used in lab environment to reduce possible noise from grounding. Separate ground wire is run and grounding for metal conduit is isolated.

You can use for residential setup without problem, but also without any advantage.
So how are they wired in said settings? I assume with metal clad (MC) cable but does that have two separate grounding wires?
So I would just wire these like normal and attach the green ground to the bare ground from the NM cable with an appropriately sized wire-nut?

These also have the "Green Dot" for Hospital Grade

Doesn't meet NEC because of the requirement to be tamper proof
I know the NEC requirement is tamper resistant. I dislike them (hard to insert a plug properly) I mean electricity has been around over 100 years now I lived though childhood and so did my mother and her mother & father etc. Basic safety things shoud be tought to kids NEC is not a baby sitter.

I don't want to sound rude so please don't take this as such but in my opinion the NEC has gone beyond the "minimum standard" that it is supposed to be and is nothing but a manufactures paradise with kickbacks (probably) from mandating all of this modern junk such as AFCIs on every circuit in the panel and now surge protection in the panel.

I agree with the GFCI technology as they are proven and have been around over 40 years so all of the kinks are pretty much worked out, on the other hand the AFCI technology is fairly new and still has a lot of work to be done before they should be required everywhere.
 
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Old 12-03-20, 11:34 PM
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In setting where isolated ground is wanted a separate green insulated ground wire is run. It is kept separate from the grounding of metal boxes and conduits. The green wire from the receptacle connects to the green isolated ground.
In your home you connect the green wire to all the other grounds in the box or to the screw on a box if the box is metal.
 
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Old 12-03-20, 11:44 PM
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In setting where isolated ground is wanted a separate green insulated ground wire is run. It is kept separate from the grounding of metal boxes and conduits. The green wire from the receptacle connects to the green isolated ground.
In your home you connect the green wire to all the other grounds in the box or to the screw on a box if the box is metal.
So the conduit and boxes are separately grounded from the grounding prong of what ever device is plugged into the receptacle so the MC is the ground and a separate insulated green wire is in the MC spiral thing?

OK thank you I think my thick head gets the jist of this now.

I was told and looked them up these are Hospital Grade and are the top of the line in the wiring device category as they have to meet vary strict requirements to stand up to the use (and abuse) of a health care facility.

I got a steal on these devices!
 
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Old 12-05-20, 09:56 AM
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MC cable does not use the sheath as a grounding means. You would need 2 identified conductors for isolated ground devices.
 
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Old 12-05-20, 12:15 PM
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OK thank you I think my thick head gets the jist of this now.
They are Hospital Grade Isolated Ground wiring devices that you are using in a residential application. I'd just wire them as normal with 12-2 NM-B cable and be sure all metal boxes are grounded. Actually, I would never have bought them in the first place.

If you want to wire them with HCF MC cable, there are 4 wires to work with; 1 hot, 1 neutral, 1 green grd and 1 bonding wire within the metal sheath.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/AFC-Cabl...2-00/204794276
 
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Old 12-06-20, 12:38 AM
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Well the boxes are plastic and most have 14-2 With ground.
Never seen black sheathed NM cable before (this place is from the late 1970's).
I bought them because for $8 why not?
Each receptacle weighs about 1 LB or more way heaver the 5320 ones.
Only four 20A circuits in the whole place Living room Kitchen x 2 electric base board heat (240V double pole so six 20A breakers but four circuits)
 
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Old 12-07-20, 12:00 PM
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The devices are 15 amp rated so 14-2 will work. They will also work on 20 amp circuits. I recall some black NM cable from the late '70s, it was Southwire as I recall. Back in those days I would avoid Southwire products because their NM cable was so stiff and hard to work with, but it was priced right. I also recall brown and red NM cable in addition to white. My favorites back then were either General Cable or EtcoFlex which was very flexible and easy to work with, both were white.
 
 

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