Holes when installing ceiling lighting: Is this normal?


  #1  
Old 03-03-21, 01:11 PM
F
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2021
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Holes when installing ceiling lighting: Is this normal?


​​​​​​Hello,
I have somebody installing recessed lighting in my basement, Is it normal to have this many holes cut in my ceiling?
Thanks for any help.
 

Popular Reply

 
03-03-21, 04:08 PM
joecaption
joecaption is offline
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,877
Received 99 Votes on 87 Posts
It would have been far easier to repair to have snapped 2 straight lines and made 2 long cuts and removed that whole section.
Now your stuck trying to patch a bunch of odd ball sized holes.
 
  #2  
Old 03-03-21, 01:31 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 68
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
If the ceiling joists run that perpendicular to the line of those holes and you don't have an attic above the joists, then yes.

If the far away can is also new, then he could run the wiring the same cavity and didn't need to make any new holes.
 
  #3  
Old 03-03-21, 01:48 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: US
Posts: 544
Received 24 Votes on 23 Posts
The joists between the lights are shown in blue in the very rough drawing below. To get the wire from light A to light B, holes have to be drilled in the joists, and when there is a finished floor above, you have to cut some holes in the ceiling.. Some people cut a hole between every joist and some cut a hole between every other joist. A hole between every joist is quicker and a hold between every other joist means less drywall repair. If often boils down to cost; who costs less, the electrician or the drywaller.
And HVAC ducts can create problems.


 
  #4  
Old 03-03-21, 03:46 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,252
Received 113 Votes on 98 Posts
Some will try to to drill blindly with a long flexible bit, but it can have a mind of its own and drill through the floor above or anything in between holes like ductwork and plumbing.
 
  #5  
Old 03-03-21, 03:50 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 61,872
Received 1,480 Votes on 1,368 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

Ah.... yes. The tales we could tell with flexibits.
 
joecaption voted this post useful.
  #6  
Old 03-03-21, 04:08 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,877
Received 99 Votes on 87 Posts
It would have been far easier to repair to have snapped 2 straight lines and made 2 long cuts and removed that whole section.
Now your stuck trying to patch a bunch of odd ball sized holes.
 
Norm201, pcboss, Tolyn Ironhand voted this post useful.
  #7  
Old 03-03-21, 04:57 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,886
Received 326 Votes on 281 Posts
It won't be too bad if the pieces were saved in one piece.
 
  #8  
Old 03-03-21, 06:00 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,083
Received 332 Votes on 286 Posts
I agree with Joecaption, It is easier to fix one long hole than a bunch of little holes.

That said, any taper should be able to fix it.
 
  #9  
Old 03-04-21, 03:10 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 7,293
Received 489 Votes on 453 Posts
Ive done that many times for lights and elec boxes but I use a 4' round hole saw! Either way, easy to patch!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: