taking a non-code outlet out of service


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Old 04-12-21, 07:03 AM
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taking a non-code outlet out of service

I have a non-GFCI outlet in my bathroom medicine cabinet, right over the sink. I have to bring my electric up to code in order to get a loan. It would cost me too much to have an electrician remove it, replace it because as far as I can tell you'd have to remove the medicine cabinet and I'm not gonna pay someone $200 bucks or more for such a stupid thing. Is there any other way to make it legal? What if I epoxed the outlet holes closed, or something like that, to render it unuseable?
 
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Old 04-12-21, 07:12 AM
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Hi, post a pic of the medicine cabinet, if the outlet is built in as usual it should be easy enough to remove.
Donít epoxy anything!
Geo 🇺🇸
 
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Old 04-12-21, 07:15 AM
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If the medicine cabinet is fed from another outlet, you could convert that to GFCI and provide downstream protection. Or you could convert the entire circuit that feeds the medicine cabinet with a GFCI breaker.
 
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Old 04-12-21, 07:36 AM
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Put in a GFCI breaker in the panel for that circuit.
 
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Old 04-12-21, 08:03 AM
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I probably should have posted my usual disclaimer: I'm electrically inept.

1) How would I tell if the outlet is downstream from another? There is another wall outlet 2 feet away that I will be replacing with GFCI. That will be easy so that would be a simple solution...if they are in line.

2) Joed- I am having my whole breaker panel replaced with the loan, but this needs to be fixed before they will give me the loan.

3) picture
 
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Old 04-12-21, 08:07 AM
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Forum makes it awful hard to post a picture!!!


try this i.*******/PF6qDXr/IMG-2260.jpg
 
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Old 04-12-21, 09:42 AM
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Nevermind. The correct answer is duct tape. I covered it with duct tape and the inspector didn't even see it.
 
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Old 04-13-21, 01:30 AM
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I am with Joed on this. Replace the present breaker feeding that medicine cabinet light with a GFCI breaker and now it is GFCI protected. I have done this on several homes. It is perfectly acceptable. Whether you replace the regular receptacle with a GFCI receptacle or replace the breaker with a GFCI breaker you will be protecting the circuit the same way. The whole idea is to prevent personal injury especially if the medicine cabinet is metal.
 
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Old 04-13-21, 10:23 AM
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Glad to hear you got your inspection!

When you do have your panel replaced, have the electrician update the bathroom and kitchen receptacles. Along with smoke and CO detectors, it's a safety upgrade that's well worth doing asap.
 
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Old 04-19-21, 04:15 AM
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I have a federal pacific panel. I'm not replacing anything with more fed pac until I replace the whole panel with someting safe, then I will do as you say and have a GFCI breaker installed on that circuit or on the adjacent outlet if they are in line. I've never used that outlet in the 20 years I've lived here so its really not a hazard.
 
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Old 04-20-21, 07:33 AM
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Nevermind. The correct answer is duct tape. I covered it with duct tape and the inspector didn't even see it.
Well I hate to say this but if the outlet is still live (AKA hot) you probably just made it a bigger hazard as duct-tape is somewhat conductive plus it leaves behind crap and adhesive residue when removed!

Is the Federal Pacific a fuse or breaker panel?
If it is a fuse panel it is likely fine as long as not greenies (30A fuses) are put in ever fuse holder or a penny placed behind the fuses.
A breaker panel Stab-lok should be replaced ASAP!
The only issue with fuses are over fusing (Greenies or pennies) and not having spare fuses hence putting a penny behind them as a "temporary" fix but them months or years go by until something has an issue and the cable becomes the fuse and gets so hot the wood studs get ignited also!
 
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Old 04-26-21, 06:23 AM
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That's OK, I took the duct tape off now. I just needed the inspector to not see that outlet and it worked. Like I said I never use it so its no real risk.

Yes its a stab-lok panel and its the first thing on my list to get replaced as soon as my loan comes through.
 
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