220v Circuit wiring/wire


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Old 04-27-21, 03:32 AM
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220v Circuit wiring/wire

Hello,

I need to run a couple of lines for a few saws for a wood shop for 3hp saws. I was thinking to have a 30 amp circuit and wondering does one use 10/2 or 10/3 for something like this?

Thanks.
 
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Old 04-27-21, 03:42 AM
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There are a few things we need to know first before we can advise you properly.

Big factor: Is this workshop attached to the house or detached?

Yes 10 gauge is proper for 30amp however it depends on the length of the run. Are you sure 30 amps would be enough power for the workshop?

If the workshop is detached from the house you can only run one circuit. In the workshop you can install a subpanel to give you 120 and 240v service but if the workshop is detached then you need to run 4 wires to the workshop. 2 hot, neutral and ground. Then two ground rods 6 feet apart 8 feet deep.

If it is detached what type of cable are you running?

Give more details so we are not guessing.

The simple fact if 10 gauge is sufficient for 30amp is yes but other things are factored in and may change that answer.

 
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Old 04-27-21, 03:47 AM
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Thanks for the quick reply.

The garage is attached and has a 100 amp sub panel in the garage. I had planned to add a circuit to this panel. The panel to the run where I want this circuit is around 30 feet in wire length from the panel to the outlet.

What else am I missing that would help?

Below is the sawstop plug too if that helps


 
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Old 04-27-21, 04:49 AM
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Hi, thatís a 15 amp 250 volt plug, how many saws are you setting up?
Geo 🇺🇸
 
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Old 04-27-21, 05:04 AM
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I had planned on dedicating a circuit just for this saw.
 
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Old 04-27-21, 08:06 AM
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maybe 10 gauge wire is overkill for this?
 
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Old 04-27-21, 09:57 AM
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Electrical nameplate pix would be useful here. Also, this is conduit (EMT) or flex or NM cable? 10 AWG is probably overkill, and a single 15A receptacle should not be protected with a 30A breaker.
There might be overcurrent recommendation on the nameplate or user manual.
FLA on 3HP might be higher than that plug rating; so, need to see a bit more info.
 
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Old 04-27-21, 10:07 AM
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Sorry not sure I follow all of what you mean telecom guy . Does the below help here? This came off the saw:

 
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Old 04-27-21, 10:54 AM
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There is some chance that a 15A breaker will not hold the starting current for this motor. I'd design with 20A breaker, conductors, recept and plug. Did that 15A plug come with the unit new? Do you have the manual?
 
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Old 04-27-21, 11:02 AM
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here is the manual and yes it did come with that plug:
https://www.sawstop.com/images/uploa....0%2009-13.pdf

That would be nice if i could use a 20amp breaker as I could instead use 12 gauge wire right? I have a bunch of 12/2 but little 10 gauge.

Does this help?
 
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Old 04-27-21, 01:38 PM
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Bline22:

The name plate on power consuming devices (saw) such as you have is a guide to let you know many things - mainly the specs of the device (saw etc). This is what the manufacturer rated the item at. This information the plate will determine what you will need in the way of the gauge wire/s, breaker and the female receptacle to fit the plug you show. Take a look at this straight blade plug chart. You will see all the different configurations. The configurations are different for one reason - to prevent you from plugging in the saw (device) into a receptacle that is not rated for it. It is a safety feature. Amperage and voltage determine the configuration of the receptacle and matching plug.

I need to run a couple of lines for a few saws for a wood shop for 3hp saws. I was thinking to have a 30 amp circuit and wondering does one use 10/2 or 10/3 for something like this?
The gauge is determined by the amperage (30amp = 10 gauge) and also determined by what you will be powering on the circuit. The number of conductors is determined by the voltage needs which you have not specified (you only mention one saw in the first post but state several).. Example: If the saw is rated 120v/240v 30amps then you would need 10gauge wire with 3 conductors (2 hots, 1 neutral and 1 ground - so it would be a 10/3 wg 'wg' stands for with ground.) If the saw requires strictly 240v then you would only need 2 hots and a ground10/2wg as a neutral in this case would not be needed.
 
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Old 04-27-21, 03:03 PM
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I would install a 20 amp circuit using 12 gauge wire.
 
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Old 04-27-21, 03:11 PM
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It is a 15 amp Plug. You need to install a 15 amp 240 volt receptacle. You can use the 12/2 for that.
If you use any other amperage circuit you need to replace the plug to match the amperage.
The plug and receptacle need to match the breaker.
From the manual.
his saw is intended for use on a circuit that has an outlet that looks like the one illustrated in Sketch A. The saw has a grounding plug that looks like the plug illustrated in Sketch A. Make sure the saw is connected to an outlet having the same configuration as the plug. No adapter is available or should be used with this saw. If the saw must be reconnected for use on a different type of electric circuit, the reconnection should be made by qualified service personnel; and after reconnection, the saw should comply with all local codes and ordinances.
 
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Old 04-28-21, 09:45 AM
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Thanks for the replies and glad I can use this 12/2 as well for this. I have an eaton panel. Would this breaker work for this application?

https://www.menards.com/main/electri...7593308&ipos=7
 
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Old 04-28-21, 06:31 PM
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If your panel has black handles (BR) then that is the correct breaker.
 
 

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