Bathroom lights and fan-separate wiring for generator


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Old 05-01-21, 10:19 PM
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Bathroom lights and fan-separate wiring for generator

I'm planning out my wiring for my house build, I currently have most of my boxes and fixtures bought and am a couple weeks from pulling a permit.
I have a 32 place GE 200 amp main panel and a GE 100 amp 14 place sub-panel which I will be dividing out my generator circuits into. Consensus from the family is that we would want to have the fridge, lights, TV/DVD player, and select outlets(to charge phones) powered during an outage. Currently we have an older gas 7500 watt generator, but are trying to be conservative with the power in case of fuel shortages or if we have to downsize to a smaller generator. On the other end of things I'll be using a 100 amp transfer switch and sub-panel in the case I can afford a larger generator down the road.
Anyway, this leaves one minor potential problem. I don't want the bathroom fans to function when we have an outage, only the lights in the bathrooms. This requires running two separate circuits into the same double wall box in the bathroom one for lights one for the fans/outlets. They would of course, have the neutrals and hots remain separated. One circuit would power the lights, another would power the fan and a couple outlets with a GFCI outlet protecting the outlet string. Searching appears to show this seems acceptable per code?
Location is in WA state, USA.
 
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Old 05-02-21, 04:07 AM
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Why are you so worried about the bathroom vent fans??? It certainly can't be because of their current draw. Just put the bathroom fan and light on the same circuit.
 
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Old 05-02-21, 04:14 AM
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Have a separate wall switch or fan grille switch for the fan and don't flip the switch on.
 
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Old 05-02-21, 05:51 AM
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As Allan posted, just because the circuit is powered by the generator doesn't mean you have to turn on that load. Just don't turn on the fans.

However, to answer your question, it is not a code violation to have more than one circuit in a box.
 
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Old 05-03-21, 09:35 AM
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"As Allan posted, just because the circuit is powered by the generator doesn't mean you have to turn on that load. Just don't turn on the fans."

Tell that to our kids that can't even remember to flush the toilet half the time lol. Yes I'm worried about amp draw, for example if we end up going with a multi-fuel Yamaha 2000 watt or something along those lines. I could easily see the kids "forgetting" and turning on something causing the generator to drop out.
 
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Old 05-03-21, 02:30 PM
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Bath fans draw very little power. I just did a quick check and a simple 80 CFM fan draws 20 watts or .17 amps. Not much more than a LED light bulb.
 
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Old 05-10-21, 02:05 PM
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Ironhand,

The specs on the 50CFM fans on HD's site said 0.9 amps, and I couldn't find a spec for the 110CFM fan I've chosen for the master bath. Broan couldn't answer the question regarding amp draw, looking at the Q&A for the fans on HD's site lol. I thought I was looking at 5-6 amps for all the fans, if it's indeed like 20% of that I won't worry about it and won't bother to divide the circuits in the bathrooms.

 
 

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