Multiple GFCIs chained together


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Old 01-24-22, 03:55 PM
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Multiple GFCIs chained together

So I think all of our bathrooms are on the same circuit. I installed a GFCI on the downstairs guest, upstairs guest a master bedroom and had to reset them in that reverse order. Do you need multiple GFCI's on the same circuit or will one at the beginning be enough? I'm guessing the downstairs guest is the first in the order.
 
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Old 01-24-22, 04:05 PM
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You can use one GFI in the first location between the breaker and the receptacles to protect all the receptacles on the same circuit. However, that is a frugal method and many don't like it.

I have a condo complex where one GFI receptacle in one bathroom protects 5-8 receptacles all over the house. In its day.... that was code. Now..... I've installed a GFI receptacle at almost every location. This is good because only the local GFI receptacle will trip. No need to hunt all over the house.

Each GFI receptacle is connected as a LINE device. The LOAD is not used on the GFI receptacle.
 
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Old 01-24-22, 04:43 PM
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One in the beginning is enough and GFCI should not be installed behind another GFCI (on load side). Since you have multiple GFCI already installed, it is best to just connect them on line side (which bypasses GFCI).
Having GFCI receptacle independent from other GFCI makes it easier to reset. It just costs more.
 
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Old 01-24-22, 09:53 PM
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Then there's an important point I wanted to bring up: I had to switch the LINE and LOAD wires otherwise the GFI would stay green and the reset button would press but give no response and the test button would be stiff. The idea to do this came from this article:

https://diy.stackexchange.com/questi...o-power/133562

I don't know if you have any input on this. And it does seem that the newer standard is a GFCI at every relevant outlet.
 
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Old 01-24-22, 10:04 PM
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Yes.... wiring would be an important point you left out.
Connections to the GFI receptacle don't affect how tight the buttons are.
A GFI will not reset without 120v power on the LINE terminals.

You would not just randomly reverse the wires on the receptacle. You'd want to use a meter to make sure to connect power to the LINE side.

If you have multiple GFI receptacles on the same circuit and they are considered standalone.....then they should only be connected to LINE. You only use LINE and LOAD when you want one GFI receptacle to protect the other non-GFI receptacles connected after it.
 

Last edited by PJmax; 01-24-22 at 11:45 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 01-24-22, 10:32 PM
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OK so there were a total of four wires in each receptacle: 2 black and 2 white alongside 2 ground wires that were twister together. Only one of the black wires had power. I joined that wire and the accompanying white wire into the LINE row (contrary to the instructions in the manual) and the other set of wires into the LOAD.

Otherwise the GFCI wouldn't work and it appears that the article I linked described doing that.

Should I try it again? I'm thinking that maybe i have to set up all the GFCIs first to get it working even though it is working well as-is and all the outlets have this backwards setup.

​​​​​​Edit: and yes, i did test which one of the pairs had the power.
 
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Old 01-24-22, 11:50 PM
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You need power on the LINE terminals to operate correctly.
You only use the LOAD terminals if you want that GFI to protect all other receptacles after it.
You wouldn't want to connect multiple GFI's using the LOAD connection.
When you do that one can trip the one before it. Creates confusion.

For multiple GFI receptacles on the same circuit.....
You'd want to connect the incoming line cable and the outgoing power cable both to LINE.
The LOAD connections would not be used.
 
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Old 01-25-22, 10:20 AM
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You're right and I just realized that there is a single GFCI in the garage that acts as the first point in the circuit. I thought they build the house outside of code but it was there all along. Woops!

Thanks for your help.
 
 

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