Equivalent of removing the bulb from LED lighting


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Old 02-14-22, 04:10 PM
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Equivalent of removing the bulb from LED lighting

I have LED lightings installed in multiple places in my home I just moved into.
I'd like "remove the bulb" from some of them in the porch because I think there are too many.
What would be the equivalent of removing the bulb from LED lighting? Remove the whole thing, or can I disconnect it somehow and keep it in place.

They look like the attached pictures and that one was removed to install a fan.

Thanks in advance



 

Last edited by matt77; 02-14-22 at 04:12 PM. Reason: fix a typo
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Old 02-14-22, 04:22 PM
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LEDs do look a lot brighter than CFL and incandescent bulbs rated for about same lumen output but they use a lot less energy. That fixture cannot be modified. You could install a dimmer switch to reduce the light level. Since it is a porch light you could install a smart switch that can dim and also be programmed like a timer. You may even be able to program it to adjust the turn-on time according to sunset.
 
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Old 02-14-22, 04:24 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

That is an LED fixture. It is used exactly like it is. If it's too bright you would remove it and install a lower wattage LED fixture. That fixture is shown as 15 watts. That is a lot of light. You could replace that with a 5-7 watt unit for reduced light.

You could look into an electronic LED dimmer but those fixtures don't usually dim well.
 
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Old 02-14-22, 07:26 PM
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Or you can disconnect the black wire, put a wire nut on each black wire (so it doesn't touch anything else) and reinstall the fixture. It may look funny being "burned out", but it's certainly safe and doable.

Or you can remove the fixture completely and replace with a blank rectangular or round plate.
 
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Old 02-14-22, 09:24 PM
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Thanks for the answers guys, just to clarify I have 4 of those installed on the porch and planning to "turn off" 2 and keep the other 2 as is. Not planning to alter or modify the fixture itself. I think Zorfdt's suggestion makes sense, I can disconnect the black wires for the 2 I'd like to "turn off"
 
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Old 02-15-22, 05:58 AM
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I can just tell. In a few years after you sell the house the new owners will be posting on here asking why two of their lights don't work. When doing things like that I like to put a note somewhere visible, like maybe inside the fixture where you can see it when you remove the globe, stating that power to the light was disconnected immediately underneath this fixture.
 
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Old 02-15-22, 08:13 AM
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One potential problem with LED lighting is that the part that can wear out (the "lamp" or "bulb" or "tube" or "element") may be discontinued by the manufacturer. Then you have to replace the entire fixture, possibly having to call an electrician, and the new fixture might not match the existing fixtures. (In your case you have to replace the entire fixture anyway; there is no replaceable unit inside.)

Even if there is a replaceable lamp inside, If you de-activated some of the fixtures, say, to conserve energy, then visitors and, when the time comes, potential buyers, will see that some of the lights are "out" ... unless you re-activated them every time you had company or when you put the house on the market.

Come to think of it, the center disk like part with the diodes (yellow spots) on it could conceivably be unscrewed and replaced. Except it looks like the power wires are soldered to it rather than being clipped on with a plug similar to a landline phone modular plug.

Nitpicking -- If you take apart a bundle of wires to disconnect a fixtures, after pulling out the black wire going to the fixture, wire nut back together all of the remaining wires of that bundle. No need to unhook the white wire.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 02-15-22 at 08:42 AM.
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Old 02-15-22, 09:43 AM
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Assuming that LED light fixture is dimmable, installing dimmer is the best route as others suggested.
If not, disconnecting the light is pretty much all you can do. You can keep the light in place or replace with blank cover.
 
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Old 02-15-22, 11:11 PM
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may be discontinued by the manufacturer. Then you have to replace the entire fixture
and this is why I dislike LED CRAP the integrated ones are way worse for this then the Edison based ones!
 
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Old 02-16-22, 08:50 AM
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Hi, what temperature is the LED possibly 6000K? you may be able to go with a warmer color ie 2700K
just a thought!
Geo 🇺🇸
 
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Old 02-16-22, 11:56 AM
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what temperature is the LED possibly 6000K
3000K if the filled circle is correct
 
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Old 02-16-22, 12:06 PM
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Turn the fixture on for about how long they would normally be on.
Then feel the LEDs to see if they get hot.
If OK and odds are they will stay cool.
Tape over half of them if you want half the light output etc.
Tape a note or write on a piece of masking tape " I taped over some LED's cause it was too bright"
 
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Old 02-16-22, 08:19 PM
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the integrated ones are way worse for this then the Edison based ones!
Actually, E based ones are worse in many cases. Due to limited space and also due to them made so cheaply LED bulbs doesn't last as long as they should. I had 6 bulbs fail in a little less than a year so far.
If you have premium brands (such as Cree), it lasts, but price tags are also pretty high.

Although it is not true for all integrated LED light fixtures, most reputable brands last longer than cheap LED bulbs. They also put out more light than bulbs for same power they use. (more efficient).


Hi, what temperature is the LED possibly 6000K?
6000K LED is rare these days. Unlike 6000K fluorescent, it is way too blue for LED. Most daylight LEDs are rated 5000K.
Personally, I like 4000K, but it is rare to find 4000K bulbs. It is often found is temperature changeable fixtures and they do it by including both 2700K and 5000K LEDs and turn both of them on. This probably is why 4000K is hard to find in bulbs.

3000K is next best color.
 
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Old 02-17-22, 01:18 PM
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bulbs fail in a little less than a year
Check the manufacturer's website for replacement process.

I have had several LED bulbs that failed replaced for free by MaxLite and Feit. Some were within the "5 year warranty" stated on the package and some were not. Mine were all done by email. Even when asked for date of purchase, a receipt was not required.
 
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Old 02-17-22, 03:22 PM
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Actually, E based ones are worse in many cases. Due to limited space and also due to them made so cheaply LED bulbs doesn't last as long as they should. I had 6 bulbs fail in a little less than a year so far.
If you have premium brands (such as Cree), it lasts, but price tags are also pretty high.

Although it is not true for all integrated LED light fixtures, most reputable brands last longer than cheap LED bulbs. They also put out more light than bulbs for same power they use. (more efficient).
Sorry I was talking about ease of replacement though if an Edison based one fails just unscrew and and screw in a new one.
 
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Old 02-17-22, 09:03 PM
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Check the manufacturer's website for replacement process.
I did, and some I have to pay shipping. Not worth it.
Home Depot Ecosmart bulbs are warranted through Home Depot and those can be replaced under warranty at Home depot if you kept original receipt.
 
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