Was 16AWG ever rated for 15A? Plus opening cordclamp


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Old 08-05-22, 11:42 PM
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Question Was 16AWG ever rated for 15A? Plus opening cordclamp

I bought an older (probably from the late 1980's - early 1990's) made in Taiwan metal cased (that is why I bought it) power strip and the cord is a SJT 16AWG/3C cordset. The 15A circuit breaker is made by "Zing Ear" along with the red neon lighted switch so my question is was 16AWG EVER rated for 15A in any degree (the cord says 60C) column or any NEC code cycle?

Also how do you get those "Heyco" style cord clamps open the standard modern style that snaps into a panel does such a tool exist that I can squeeze the tabs and pull them out without destroying the plastic clamp or the cord or everything in the process?

I would post a picture but the board seems to be having an issue with that for the last week or so.

Thanks
 
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Old 08-06-22, 04:37 AM
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More than likely the power strip is not UL certified.
 
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Old 08-06-22, 04:47 AM
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Power strips are likely to fall into the same category as extension cords so the size of the wire is up to the manufacturer. I would bet the tag on the power strip said that it is only rated for 13 amps.

If you are talking about the black or gray MN cable clamps, you can pry them out with a screwdriver.

If you are talking about the blue NM cable clamps, all you can do is cut them out.
 
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Old 08-06-22, 08:51 AM
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There are pliers available for installing and removing Heyco grommets.
Rather than posting a pic you may not be able to see.... Heyco grommet pliers
 
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Old 08-06-22, 01:13 PM
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@beelzebob probably not UL listed

@Tolyn Ironhand the tag says 15A max!, I was talking about the strain relief grommets for SO and SPT type portable cordage as I now know they are called and not the NM cable clamps

@PJmax Thank You! I'll probably get This as they genuine Heyco ones are too pricey for me and it is not like I deal with these everyday maybe a few times a year but I have been avoiding them as I didn't know a tool for them was available
 
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Old 08-07-22, 05:02 AM
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At one time, 14-2 non-metallic sheathed cable (NM; Romex-like) cable with a 16 gauge equipment grounding conductor was common.
 
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Old 08-08-22, 03:33 AM
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AlanJ I remember coming across an old NM cable that was like that!

In my apartment the stove is wired with copper 8/3 with what looks to be a 12AWG green coated copper grounding wire.

Also the white a green are in the same terminal on the NEMA 10-50R and the stove use the matching 10-50P cordset!
I guess this was probably normal in the early 1980's when this place was built?
The remodels now have the proper way with the NEMA 14-50 type receptacles and cord sets.

Anyway I took the cord (for light duty 13A max use LoL) switch and circuit breaker and tossed the rest as it was not worth fixing as some of the receptacles would not hold plugs plus I only paid $1 for it so not worth my time plus the parts are worth more then I paid for it.
 
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Old 08-11-22, 04:06 PM
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Also the white a green are in the same terminal on the NEMA 10-50R and the stove use the matching 10-50P cordset!
I guess this was probably normal in the early 1980's when this place was built?
The remodels now have the proper way with the NEMA 14-50 type receptacles and cord sets.
That was never normal or correct. In the early 1980s the 10-50R receptacle was all that was required for a range unless it was fed from a subpanel in which the 14-50R would have been correct. The 8-3 NM cable used for range circuits back then was typically 8-3 plain with no grounding conductor. When 8-3 w/Grd was used the grounding conductor should have just not been used when termination to a 10-50R receptacle.
 
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Old 08-14-22, 04:16 PM
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It is fed from a sub panel as the main is outside with the meters for all 4 apartments!

I only know this (about the wring that is) because I moved the stove to clean it and the receptacles cover was already missing so I went a got a new 10-50R and used just the cover luckily they remained unchanged throughout the years.

It looks to be 8 gauge and is on a 50A breaker which probably should be a 40A one? The stove is a 22" "Apartment sized" stove
 
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Old 08-22-22, 01:38 PM
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It looks to be 8 gauge and is on a 50A breaker which probably should be a 40A one? The stove is a 22" "Apartment sized" stove
​​​​​​​Assuming it was NM cable then yes, it should be protected at NO MORE Than 40 amps.
 
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Old 08-23-22, 04:40 AM
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The 15 amp rating of a conductor is based on building construction rules and is tied in with the capacity of the breaker that protects it
Cords and internal wiring fall under fixture wiring rules.
The reason cords can be a smaller gauge than the building wiring is that a 15 amp cct is not (here anyway) allowed except for a momentary starting load to draw over 12 amps.
 
 

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