Help with Grounding my Generator


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Old 09-21-22, 10:31 AM
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Help with Grounding my Generator

Hi everyone,

Ok, so I have this generator: Westinghouse WH7500E
Connected to my breaker panel using this transfer switch: Reliance Pro/Tran 31410CRK

I did the connection, BTW. It works when the power is out but I'm not sure if I have it running safely.

After doing some reading and learning, I'm trying to understand
1) Is my generator Westinghouse WH7500E bonded or a floating neutral type?
2) Is my transfer Reliance Pro/Tran 31410CRK switch directly connected to the main neutral in my main panel? or does it switch over?

I think these are the things I need to know to determine if I need a grounding rod.

thanks!
 
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Old 09-21-22, 11:15 AM
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What model interlock are you using?
 
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Old 09-21-22, 11:35 AM
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What model interlock are you using?
I'm not using an interlock. Just that 10 circuit transfer switch listed above.
 
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Old 09-21-22, 12:04 PM
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Neutral bond is not critical in your application as that generator does not have a 2P GFI breaker.
Just connect the four wires as labeled.

The neutral of that transfer panel connects to the main panel neutral bar.
 
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Old 09-21-22, 01:26 PM
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TRANSFER SWITCH CONNECTIONS (page 21)

...

"A two-pole transfer switch will not switch the neutral
from the generator to the service panel. That means
the generator will be grounded to the service panel. To
use the generator with two-pole transfer switches, the
electrician will need to change the neutral from bonded
to floating.

This is done by removing the jumper wire that connects
the alternator ground to the alternator neutral. Remove
the jumper wire and retighten the connections."

If are not using an interlock, you could feed power back to the grid, injuring or possibly killing a lineman.
 
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Old 09-21-22, 01:34 PM
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Don't see how that applies here.

The OP is not using a transfer switch.
He's using a ten circuit transfer panel.

It's perfectly fine having the generator bonded. The neutral and ground are still maintained separately.
The main problem is when there is a GFI breaker involved.
In that case the generator cannot be bonded or the GFI breaker will trip.
 

Last edited by PJmax; 09-21-22 at 01:56 PM.
  #7  
Old 09-21-22, 05:12 PM
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Awesome, thank you! So I don't need to drive a copper grounding rod into the ground and connect to generator bc, as I understand, the generator is connected to the main ground and neutral bars on the main breaker panel?

If so, sounds like this snippet from the owners manual (as called out above) kinda contradicts the idea:

"A two-pole transfer switch will not switch the neutral from the generator to the service panel. That means the generator will be grounded to the service panel. To use the generator with two-pole transfer switches, the
electrician will need to change the neutral from bonded to floating."

So is this transfer switch a "two pole"? I thought it was b/c it says I can connect two pole circuits. And if so, the manual is saying it needs to be 'unbonded'.
 
 

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