Running Wire between floors


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Old 11-17-22, 05:05 PM
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Running Wire between floors

I am trying to run some Ethernet wires from my main floor to my basement. In the basement there is a steel I-beam (6" wide) that runs the width of the basement room. It looks like the wall above it sits on the location of the I-beam. I am stuck, I don't know how to get the wiring between floors. On top of the i-beam sits a piece of particle board (I think). I was considering trying to drill sideways through the particle board to get around the I-beam, but I am not sure if that will work. It really doesn't look like there is any other suitable place to go between the floors. Also, since I have a standard size outlet I don't have much room to work with, for drilling etc. Is there any other solution to this problem. It is crazy bad luck I feel like.
 
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Old 11-17-22, 06:43 PM
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Sometimes wires and cables come through the floor because there is no elegant way to come through the wall. Sounds like you might be in one of those situations.
 
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Old 11-17-22, 07:07 PM
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If you cannot rise directly through the wall, look for an alternate route where the cable might run exposed but out of sight like through a closet, pipe chase, etc. Sometimes a cable can be run exposed in one room where it is less likely to be seen and then through the wall to its final destination. I have a cable that runs along a baseboard exposed (but behind a bed) in a bedroom and through the wall to the TV in the family room. Also, alarm system wires in a hall closet to get from basement to second floor.
 
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Old 11-17-22, 07:19 PM
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You can usually drill up at an angle right next to the beam and come out inside the wall. You will have subflooring and the bottom plate of the wall will be on top of that. In order to judge the angle needed to drill you have to know precisely where the wall is located with respect to the beam. The easiest way to do that accurately is to drill a tiny hole straight up through the floor right next to the beam. This means you will have a tiny hole in the flooring, but it usually won't be noticeable unless you are down on your hands and knees. Once you know how far the wall is from the edge of the beam you can judge the angle you need to drill to end up inside the wall. You may need an extra long drill bit to do the job.

Plan B: WiFI instead of wired.
 
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Old 11-18-22, 04:13 AM
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To me, drilling up is a last resort. If you have carpet, the drill can snag the carpet and pull a thread creating a visible line in the carpet. Drill down and see if you hit the beam. Cut the straight section from a wire coat hanger with wire cutters for an impromptu drill bit.

Pull the carpet back from the baseboard and drill straight down next to the baseboard. A piece of plastic milk jug makes a nice shield so you don't mar the baseboard. If no carpet, there is probably shoemold on the baseboard. Pry it loose away from the ends and drill behind the shoemold.

Let us know what does/doesn't work.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

EDIT: If the coat hanger gets dull, just snip off the tip (try that with a regular bit ). If you must drill up, the coat hanger bit has less of a chance of snagging the carpet. Get just thru the wood, remove the drill motor and push up.
 

Last edited by ThisOldMan; 11-18-22 at 06:41 AM.
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Old 11-24-22, 07:08 AM
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Note: Snipping a drill bit can damage the snipper. Also the result mignt be such that the snipped bit end dances on and mars the surface, or makes a hole not quite where you wanted it.
 
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Old 11-24-22, 08:55 AM
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Note: Snipping a drill bit can damage the snipper. Also the result mignt be such that the snipped bit end dances on and mars the surface, or makes a hole not quite where you wanted it.
If the "drill bit" is made from a coat hanger as described, there is little chance of damaging the "snippers" since they were probably used to "snip" the coat hanger to begin with.
 
 

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