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What could be wired to the load terminal of my receptacle?

What could be wired to the load terminal of my receptacle?


  #1  
Old 11-27-23, 10:11 AM
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What could be wired to the load terminal of my receptacle?

I wanted to replace a simple electrical receptacle with a Levition Surge protector outlet in my home office.
As I am taking out the receptacle I noticed a yellow wire connected to the load terminal.
The black hot comes from a wire nut. I am pretty sure the wire nut is to connect my next receptacle in the room. All black wires.

I am somewhat familiar with the load concept from GFCI's where there is a function involved.

What is the purpose of the load terminal on a standard receptacle? vs. just connecting hots with a wire nut in the box?

As a test I removed the yellow wire from the terminal - I could not find out yet what is disconnected.

New info:
I just found out that the yellow wire is hot. So, it feeds the load. It is wired like "split switched outlet"
However, I have not found any switch controlling it.
 

Last edited by destruct05; 11-27-23 at 10:52 AM.
  #2  
Old 11-27-23, 10:49 AM
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Where does your yellow wire lead to?

Where specifically was the yellow wire connected to your old receptacle?

There is really no load side on a standard receptacle. You connect the hots to one side (brass screws), neutral to the other (silver screws). The outlet is often used as a connector because simply wiring to the outlet is faster than using wire nuts to create pig-tails to connect to the outlet.

 
  #3  
Old 11-27-23, 10:59 AM
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I don't know where the yellow wire goes.

It is a standard outlet that looks like this:
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Leviton-M...iece/339705359

However, the fin is cut or not there. So it seems that the idea was to have the left side on a switch.
I only have one (dual) switch in that room for a ceiling light/fan. That switch does not control the yellow wire in question. It is always hot. I also got creative and checked nearby switches in hallway etc. yellow stays hot.





 
  #4  
Old 11-27-23, 11:13 AM
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Possible the yellow wire is controlled by a different breaker than black wire. Are the ears between the 2 outlets broken on one side or both?
 
  #5  
Old 11-27-23, 11:19 AM
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I pulled out the fan/light combo switch. It turns out the yellow wire is connected to the line side of the combo switch. It is as if the builder wanted to to give the option to switch the outlet in case somebody would have not chosen a ceiling fan/light. To be clear, the yellow is currnelty not switched, just connected to line of switch (so, always hot).

I am thinking to pull that yellow wire out to avoid future confusion.
Is there a reason to keep?
 
  #6  
Old 11-27-23, 01:01 PM
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Just cap it at both ends. No need to pull out.
 
CircuitBreaker voted this post useful.
  #7  
Old 11-27-23, 03:06 PM
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When the ear or fin between the halves of an ordinary duplex receptacle is broken then both screws are line side terminals. If the ear is broken by accident or there is an afterthought then pigtails may be used to energize both halves from the same supplying conductor.

When (the hot side ear is broken and) the two halves fed by different branch circuits then the ear on the neutral side must also be broken and neutrals from the respective branch circuits put on those respective screws.

Except in certain kinds of test gear or test jigs here is no socially redeeming value in having the neutral side ear broken and the hot side ear still in place.Should this occur it is a good idea to break the ear on the hot side as a reminder that separate feeding (including the pigtailing immediately above) is needed.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 11-27-23 at 03:16 PM.
  #8  
Old 11-28-23, 02:10 AM
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Your reference to "yellow" thru me at first. I was thinking that you were referring to a cable (Romex) 12 gauge. Saw the picture and then saw location "Chicago". I believe they require conduit so this is an individual wire/conductor then.
 
 

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