Mobile Home Receptacles


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Old 11-28-23, 01:31 PM
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Mobile Home Receptacles

Hello all - In March of 2022 I moved into my new mobile home. It was built in December of 2021. The GFCI receptacle in the bathroom (feeds a receptacle to the heat tape under the mobile home) is 12/2 with ground protected by a 20A breaker. To this untrained eye, the GFCI looks like a 15A receptacle. Is there a simple way to know if the receptacle is indeed 15A or 20A? Thanks in advanced for the help. Roger
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 11-29-23 at 05:29 AM.
  #2  
Old 11-28-23, 01:58 PM
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It's most likely a 15 amp receptacle. On a 20 amp receptacle, one of the two flat slots will be "T" shaped, rather than just a straight slot. On a 20 amp plug, the blade for the hot terminal will be turned 90 degrees to the blade for the neutral. The receptacle has a "T" shaped slot to accept either the 20 amp plug or a more common 15 amp plug.
 
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Old 11-28-23, 04:33 PM
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Old 11-28-23, 05:12 PM
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Not an electrician, but I believe that 15 amp receptacles are OK for use in a 20 amp ckt.
 
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Old 11-28-23, 11:58 PM
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15 amp rated receptacles are rated for 20amp pass-tru. 15 amp receptacles are put on 20amp circuits many times and is permitted by code and is safe. You can't put a 20 amp rated receptacle on a 15 amp circuit though just so you know for future use.

Post #3 shows how to tell just by looking at the receptacles.

There are very few devices in a home that would actually require a 20amp receptacle. A 20amp plug would have the neutral prong vertical and the hot prong horizontal which would mean it is rated at 20amp so therefore would only fit in a 20amp rated receptacle. The "T" slot allows a standard plug and a 20amp rated device plug to be inserted into it - "Interchangeability".

Some UPS (Uninterrupted Power Supply) that you would use for a backup in case of a power failure so your computer does not shut down improperly. Some of the more powerful ones do use an actual 20amp plug. It would have a plug like this: One horizontal and one vertical as I described above.


 
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Old 11-29-23, 12:25 AM
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To check if the GFCI receptacle is 15A or 20A, you can usually find the amperage rating stamped on the device itself. Look closely around the plug holes, or it might be on the backside. If it's a 15A receptacle, it should say 15A, and for a 20A receptacle, it'll say 20A.
 
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Old 11-29-23, 04:04 AM
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I learned something new today. Thank you for the education. I can sleep better now.

Happy holidays.

Roger
 
 

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