Are long-corded power strips safe?


  #1  
Old 02-21-24, 06:34 AM
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Are long-corded power strips safe?

Is it bad to get a power strip that has a fairly long cord (i.e. 15')? And/or is it better/worse to plug in say 3, 5' strips (I assume that's worse). Am I better off with just a good 10' extension cord, and then a 5' power strip?

If it is ok to get a 15' power strip, I'm then having trouble finding one with a flat plug (which is a must), and from a name brand. Is it ok to get something like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0CG91YPKR

I hate buying these type of no-names (although for all I know they are all the same, made in the same factory...). It does have 4.8/5 stars on over 35k reviews (and I figure it's hard to fake that many reviews).

Normally I'd stick with Belkin or some other name that I know (though I don't really know if Belkin is any good, I've just known the name forever), but I can't find anything long enough.

Thank you!
 
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Old 02-21-24, 07:04 AM
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many use them that really does not mean there safe though because you have the potential to overload it gauge of wiring would be what I would look at if your powering anything with a significant amp draw.
 
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Old 02-21-24, 07:11 AM
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Thanks. This would really just be for 'normal' usage in a bedroom such as a lamp, an Alexa, charging a phone...
 
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Old 02-21-24, 08:45 AM
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As Alan said it depends on the gauge wire that goes to the strip. It should be stated some where on the strip or the box it is in what gauge wire is the cord. You should get one with 14 gauge wire to use all the 15 amps available from the wall plug the strip is plugged into. Wire length between 5 feet and 15 feet is no different as to how much power the strip can use. Another way to look at it is the fewer connections you have the better, So better to use the longer corded strip than an extension cord to a shorter strip cord.
 
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Old 02-21-24, 10:41 AM
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Most (all?) power strips have a power switch with built-in overload protection sized to the cable. As you probably know, the receptacles in your home provide either 15A or 20A. Many power strips are made with smaller cables (which is fine) and has a built-in circuit breaker set to 10A or 12A depending on the wire size. Which makes power strips generally much safer than extension cords, especially the lamp-cord type extension cords.

I would consider most power strips like you've mentioned to be generally safe.

Fires are usually started with power strips and extension cords when they are used in an unsafe manner. So don't:
* Overload them. Large draw devices like ACs, space heaters, microwaves, etc should never be used with extension cords
* Run them underfoot. Never run them under a carpet or through doorways where people will step on them
* Let the plugs get loose. If the plug is falling out, it can create a poor connection which creates heat and isn't good
* Let them get covered in dust. I've seen some power strips behind desks caked with 1/2" of dust. Not a good idea.


Though off-brand electrical devices aren't always high quality, it's quite rare for them to be a hazard. And frankly, even brand-name devices have occasional manufacturing problems too.

I think what you've linked to would be a good solution.
 
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Old 02-21-24, 11:04 AM
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Great, thanks everybody.
 
 

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