What the heck am I doing wrong?


  #1  
Old 02-27-24, 07:44 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
What the heck am I doing wrong?

I have to be missing something here. I've connected this outlet as-shown, and it keeps popping the switch in the breaker instantly. I don't know much about electrical but have changed switches and plugs many times.

On this plug, the bare copper is going to the ground, the white is going to "white" (which I'm assuming means neutral), and the red and black are going to "hot". I switched 3 outlets in my kitchen in the same way, and all 3 do the same thing (pop instantly). Any insight?


 
  #2  
Old 02-27-24, 08:28 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 1,071
Upvotes: 0
Received 119 Upvotes on 103 Posts
is this a switched outlet? would probably look at your old outlets the black and red may of not been connected it may of been half on a switch the other half not switched.
 
  #3  
Old 02-27-24, 10:00 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,764
Received 2,182 Upvotes on 1,952 Posts
That wiring is for a three way circuit, usually used for lighting . Outlets are not three way and do not use a traveler (red) conductor. For an outlet you need to find which of the conductors is always energized and that will connect to the hot/black terminal on an outlet which usually has a brass colored screw. The neutral/white will connect to a silver screw, plus the outlets are usually labeled with what goes where. The bare copper ground connects to the ground terminal on the outlet, usually a green screw.
 
  #4  
Old 02-27-24, 10:27 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 1,071
Upvotes: 0
Received 119 Upvotes on 103 Posts
for older outlets with 2 hot screws it was not uncommon to break the connection between the 2 giving you the ability to have 1 outlet on a switch and 1 on all the time however you cant really do that with the outlet you have but you could choose one or the other and cap one off it will either be switched or not.
 
  #5  
Old 02-27-24, 10:46 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Ah, makes sense. The old outlet (I didn't take a picture before disconnecting) had the red connected as well. Same concept as I have this, just the type that you insert, if that makes sense. So, would it be wise to remove the red wire, cap it off, and just have the black, white, and ground and try that?
 
  #6  
Old 02-27-24, 10:50 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,764
Received 2,182 Upvotes on 1,952 Posts
I would wire nut (cap) the red wire and leave it in place in case it's needed in the future. It also is a good idea to disconnect and wire nut the red conductor at the other end, wherever that is. That way you aren't energizing a wire that's not being used.
 
  #7  
Old 02-27-24, 10:52 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 1,071
Upvotes: 0
Received 119 Upvotes on 103 Posts
yes unless you want it switched then use the red and cap off the black.
 
  #8  
Old 02-27-24, 11:05 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 7
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Success! I put a cap and tape on the red wire, and tucked it away and that did the trick. So strange how the old outlets had the red connected but the new ones couldn't. But, I don't care why it worked different, I just care that it works now. Thanks for the help, everyone!

 
  #9  
Old 02-27-24, 01:43 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 27,764
Received 2,182 Upvotes on 1,952 Posts
Standard outlets can be split allowing one socket to remain powered 24/7 while the other one is controlled by a switch. Your new outlet does not offer that functionality.
 
  #10  
Old 02-27-24, 01:55 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,100
Received 3,982 Upvotes on 3,574 Posts
Your original receptacle had the hot jumper removed..... extremely common.
You HAD one circuit on each socket.
Now you've capped off a complete circuit and that GFI is on only one circuit.
No problem if you don't need both circuits.
 
CasualJoe voted this post useful.
  #11  
Old 02-27-24, 03:31 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,339
Received 878 Upvotes on 741 Posts
Now you've capped off a complete circuit and that GFI is on only one circuit.
That is not a GFCI. I suspect that is an outlet with USB ports. A GFCI would have LINE and LOAD terminals.
 
CircuitBreaker voted this post useful.
  #12  
Old 02-27-24, 05:26 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,100
Received 3,982 Upvotes on 3,574 Posts
Good eye.
 
  #13  
Old 02-28-24, 03:23 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 13,979
Received 194 Upvotes on 170 Posts
It is common in Canada for kitchen receptacles to be split wired on 2 circuits.
 
  #14  
Old 02-28-24, 06:35 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,339
Received 878 Upvotes on 741 Posts
It is also common in the US in older homes. (Pre 1970)
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: