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How can I toggle other lines off my generator transfer switch box?

How can I toggle other lines off my generator transfer switch box?


  #1  
Old 02-27-24, 10:04 PM
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Question How can I toggle other lines off my generator transfer switch box?

Finally, replaced a 4-circuit 15A Transfer Switch with a 10-circuit 30A Transfer Switch for a 9000W generator. My issue is the 2-240 dbl breakers that take up 4 of the 10 circuits; one is for the well and 1 for the septic. The septic is gravity flow and 100' + 30' below the home, and there's only 2 of us, so those 2 lines to the septic could be used elsewhere for a couple of days. Also, beyond those 2 lines, I would like to switch a couple other lines in the house if the power is out for extended periods, like this year! It can be done by switching lines in the panel, of course, but I would prefer leaving the cover on and create another switch box, basically a non-breaker box out from the main panel, substituting lines off the transfer box, and I want to do this by code.



Has anyone had a configuration like this?
 

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02-28-24, 04:57 AM
Pilot Dane
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It sounds like you really need/want the ability to power most of the house. Why not install a generator lockout kit on your main panel? They are only $30-40. Or, after all you've spent on two other transfer switches you could have a high amperage whole house transfer switch. You could power the entire panel and turn circuits on and off as you please.
 
  #2  
Old 02-28-24, 03:55 AM
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Any switch box you install that has poco and generator voltages must have an interlock to prevent generator voltage from being connected to the poco wiring.
 
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Old 02-28-24, 04:20 AM
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Now that you installed that 10 circuit transfer switch unit, I would suggest that you use extension cords to plug other things to the branch circuits served by the transfer unit.

All of those transfer switch units with several little toggles and Underwriters Labs approval contain adequate interlocking when correctly installed (240 volt circuits in proper locations).

One thing you can do it this.

Coming out of the primary breaker box, run one of your existing branch circuits (typically for a furnace or boiler) into an outlet box. where you put in one standard 3 way switch. Connect the live line to one traveler terminal. Connect the continuation or load line (to the furnace, etc.) to the common terminal. Connect the other traveler terminal to a cable that goes to another, adjacent, outlet box where you install a single male receptacle. Use another extenision cord to connect this to one of the 120 volt receptacles on your generator.

You can usually do the preceding twice, giving ou two more transferable circuits, since a typical generator has two ordinary receptacles.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 02-28-24 at 04:35 AM.
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Old 02-28-24, 04:57 AM
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It sounds like you really need/want the ability to power most of the house. Why not install a generator lockout kit on your main panel? They are only $30-40. Or, after all you've spent on two other transfer switches you could have a high amperage whole house transfer switch. You could power the entire panel and turn circuits on and off as you please.
 
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Old 02-28-24, 05:17 AM
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Unless you have a main breaker upstream. for example under the electric meter, installing a whole house transfer switch (with one big toggle) will require coordinating with the power company to turn off and then turn on your power.
 
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Old 02-28-24, 10:07 AM
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Aa separate whole house transfer switch might also require you to do some rewiring inside your panel. This is because your main panel will become a sub panel to the disconnect switch. You may have to redo the neutral and ground connections inside the panel. A interlock added to the face of the existing panel would not have that requirement.
 
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Old 02-28-24, 02:15 PM
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Thanks everybody. I like the Lockout kit Idea. And just using the outlet on the generator is also a good idea.
 
  #8  
Old 02-29-24, 02:17 PM
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Smile

I have the 10 circuit transfer switch for sale on eBay, lol. I'm taking Pilot Dane's advice, bought an interlock locking device and the 30A 4-prong outlet, I already have all the wires, and was hoping I could use the outlet from the original transfer switch, but I couldn't find a box to mount it in, so bought one already mounted. The locking device was $30 and the outlet was $55, so it was a bit more than Pilot thought it would be thanks to greedflation, but still a cheaper and easier way to go. Now I'm going to try to sell the old transfer switch, and I may end only spending $30-40 on the whole deal after all.
 
 

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