30 amp dipole feeding pool equipment potential


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Old 02-28-24, 03:30 PM
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30 amp dipole feeding pool equipment potential

Hello,
I'm in the process of reworking all of my pool equipment and the electrical that feeds it. Currently my 200 amp service on a 30 amp dipole breaker feeds a sub panel (with no main breaker) that has (2) 20 amp breakers, (1) 30 amp breaker, and 1 unmarked GFCI. The panel is a mess and currently feeds nothing other than the 220v pump, the controls for a gas heater, and the timer that controls both. My pump is 208-230/115V & 7/12.8 amps. The heater controls are a small draw as should be the mechanical timer. but would like to add lighting and an additional outlet.

My questions are:
1. how much additional load do I have for the additions? Do I count the pump as using 3.5 amps on each leg? so that would leave me 20.5 amps left for a 220v connection?

2. Does the entire sub panel need to be on a GFCI or only the breaker that would serve poll lighting?

3. A 30 amp double pole would need 10/3 feeding the sub panel correct?

This is a very old system that has not been cared for.

THANK YOU!!


Sub panel fed by 30/30 breaker


 
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Old 02-29-24, 01:31 AM
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With no disrespect directed at you but ONLY FOR YOUR SAFETY I would highly suggest that you get a licensed electrician to work on this project; one who is familiar with swimming pools and the proper bonding required not only for the functionality of the electrical system of the pool but FOR THE SAFETY FACTOR.

Looking at that panel instantly alerts me to the fact that there may have been short cuts used or that some connections are no longer valid/safe. It is a sloppy mess. I know you had nothing to do with it; this is not my point.

Bonding a swimming pool takes special skill and training of which not all electricians have. It is a specialty and the reason why it is is because of the danger involved if not bonded/wired correctly and I am not just talking about the panel itself. You are talking about installing pool lighting etc which all has to be bonded correctly to the entire system. I would not even venture trying to explain how it is done as I am not an expert or trained for swimming pools. Wiring swimming pools is not really a DIY project.

I would highly suggest that you contact a pool dealer in your area and get the name of a licensed/experienced electrician that works on swimming pools who will have the proper knowledge needed to do this correctly and most importantly safely.

It takes one mistake and someone can end up getting hurt or even killed. Water and electricity do not at all play well together as I am sure you would know and getting into a pool of water which is not properly bonded - well let's just say - I would not do it.. I knew my limitations as an electrician and i turned down working on swimming pools because I don't have the proper knowledge.
 
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Old 02-29-24, 06:32 AM
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I agree with AFJES .
 
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Old 02-29-24, 07:32 AM
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Thank you for the suggestions. I know that panel is a mess. The house was a repo and it seems everyone had a 'solution' before it became my headache. I would like to clarify. When I said 'pool lights' I did not mean lights inside/close to the pool. There are existing light posts roughly 8' outside the pool coping that exist but no longer work. I was planning on rerunning the wiring to them if I could get it working.

I will interview some electricians but would like a general idea of what I am asking for. For some context, the house is large but in rough shape but in a high end neighborhood. Consequently when a contractor comes for a bid all they see are $$$ and my bids normally end up equally as high and overdone. I do know that that is a consequence of where I bought and know I am not as affluent as my neighbors but have come to see the more specific I am in what I am asking for the more reasonable the bids on the house have historically been.
 
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Old 02-29-24, 09:30 AM
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Dzl13:
There are existing light posts roughly 8' outside the pool coping that exist but no longer work. I was planning on rerunning the wiring to them if I could get it working.
My suggestion again is to contact an electrician with the skill and knowledge of working on swimming pools.
Even though the post are about 8 feet from the pool edge there is an apron distance that the bonding is encircled in from the edge of the pool outwards. Water does not exist just at the pool edge but out beyond the edge. Are the posts far enough away from the bonding area (apron) of the pool? We don't know; do you know the specifications of how far out from the pool's edge the bonding is etc. Do the lights on the posts need to be bonded with the pool's system? Don't know. What type of cables must be run from each post and must it be bonded to the entire system? Don't know; do you? You can research it all but it will take you a long time and you better be correct the first time. Do yourself a favor and call in an electrician skilled with swimming pools. If I saw a panel like that in a home I would shiver, seeing it for a swimming pool... well.... I would wonder if the swimming pool was wired correctly to begin with.

I bought a foreclosure and I am still putting money into it as I can 8 years later but fortunately the appraised value of the home is still far above what I have put into the home so far.

Please Dzl13, take my advice. Spend the money and get an electrician in there. Talk to a few of them and let them educate you. Educating my customers is what I always did.

I will interview some electricians but would like a general idea of what I am asking for.
General idea is to find an electrician well versed in working on swimming pools. What specifically you need to ask the electrician we don't know as we are not there and can not see everything and how the pool is wired now except for the panel; but it is far more than just the panel, it is the overall bonding of the pool much of which you can't take pictures of and show us. The electrician will be able to tell as the electrician will determine by testing if the pool is properly bonded or not.



 
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Old 02-29-24, 10:52 AM
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Thank you. That is the best course of action. I appreciate your concern. I'll take your advice. Considering the condition of the panel, I have a feeling there may be no bonding but we will deal with that as it arrives. Thank you agian.
 
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