Wiring outlets


  #1  
Old 05-14-24, 02:42 PM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: NW. Ohio
Posts: 120
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Wiring outlets

I am helping a friend rewire a house. All the studs are exposed so it will be easy. All wiring and outlets, switches will be new. Family room and bedrooms will have 5+ outlets each and each room on a seperate circuit.
Is it better to daisy chain the outlets on each circuit or wire nut them and use pigtails?
 

Top Answer

 
05-15-24, 12:05 PM
Wirepuller38
Wirepuller38 is offline
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,413
Received 65 Upvotes on 56 Posts
I like using a better grade receptacle that uses side wiring where the wires slide into plates and screws.
These are referred to as back-wired. (Not to be confused with back-stabbed)
 
  #2  
Old 05-14-24, 03:41 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,415
Received 4,049 Upvotes on 3,632 Posts
If you're going to use a basic receptacles..... it would be better to make splices and add tails.
You could also use basic receptacles and wrap the four wires around the screws.
I like using a better grade receptacle that uses side wiring where the wires slide into plates and screws.

Ground wires must be spliced and tailed.
 

Last edited by PJmax; 05-14-24 at 03:52 PM.
  #3  
Old 05-14-24, 07:12 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,393
Received 893 Upvotes on 754 Posts
I do not like to rely on the receptacle for the connection of the circuit. I like to always pigtail all my devices.
 
  #4  
Old 05-15-24, 01:08 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,028
Received 169 Upvotes on 139 Posts
I always suggest go for the pig-tailing especially if it is for a friend etc.

Customer: I always asked (recommended pig-tail) what they preferred and then would charge extra for the pig-tailing. Especially if it was going to be a rental property. One failed receptacle can wipe out all of the receptacles down line and the tenant would b!tch. Only one failed receptacle tenant will b!tch far less; also less chance that an extension cord would be needed.
 
  #5  
Old 05-15-24, 05:35 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 8,052
Received 518 Upvotes on 423 Posts
I like screw terminals on receptacles. I trust them more than twist on wire nuts. Also wire nuts count for box fill in Canada.
 
  #6  
Old 05-15-24, 12:05 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,413
Received 65 Upvotes on 56 Posts
I like using a better grade receptacle that uses side wiring where the wires slide into plates and screws.
These are referred to as back-wired. (Not to be confused with back-stabbed)
 
sdodder, Wayne Mitchell voted this post useful.
  #7  
Old 05-15-24, 12:13 PM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,041
Received 24 Upvotes on 20 Posts
I quit pig tails when they came out with the wire clamp receptacles. The only time I use a pig tail is to tie grounds.
 
  #8  
Old 05-18-24, 12:57 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 1,028
Received 169 Upvotes on 139 Posts
nightowl66:
and each room on a separate circuit.
I usually share a circuit from one room to another or two circuits per room. If you put an entire room on one circuit then if there is an issue in the future with that circuit the entire room is dead which means running extension cords out of the room, thru a hallway and into another room. Corner rooms, same circuit on outside walls (if AC window to be use then individual circuit for that). Common wall from one room to another share one circuit to each room etc. So always will have live receptacles somewhere in the room. It takes more AFCI breakers but I feel it is worth it at the end especially if it is a rental unit. Less b!tching from the tenant if a circuit goes out until you can get an electrician over to look at it.




 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: