Main panel bonding...Screw or no screw?


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Old 06-21-24, 05:34 PM
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Main panel bonding...Screw or no screw?

Hi, I am pretty familiar with basic electric. Running new circuits inside the home etc, but this is my first time working with outdoor service equipment. I've done a lot of reading but I just want to know if i understand it right. Im really hoping to only have the inspector out here once..hah.

I got a 200 amp Eaton outdoor meter/panel combo with main disconnect, pole mounted, I am running that to our mobile home. I've read about bonding the main panel. That the main or first panel after the meter should be "bonded with a bonding screw" and then the subpanel inside the mobile home should not be bonded.

What I understand this to mean is that the neutral and ground should be connected (bonded) in the outdoor panel and usually this is done through a bonding screw that connects the neutral Busbar to the panel box itself. Is that right?
So on my outdoor panel it appears to me that the line in neutral lug is connected to a metal plate That runs down the back of the box, connects to where the bare copper grounding lug is and is also connected the only busbar in the box. So does that mean they're already bonded? Do I still need a bonding screw for any reason?

Also, I can't remember what it looks like inside the panel in the mobile home, but i think i understand that i will want the ground wires and neutral wires to be completely separate, different busbars and have the neutral busbar not connected to the panel box. Is that right?

Hope someone can clarify for me, I certainly appreciate it. Thanks for your help!

This is the panel box I am putting up outside, unfortunately it doesn't have any photos of the inside without the cover...

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Eaton-200-Amp-4-Spaces-8-Circuit-Main-Breaker-Meter-Combo-Load-Center/3006335

I sourced a couple photos from online but youcant see how that plate from the in line neutral connects as it's behind that thin metal wall on the right..


 
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Old 06-21-24, 05:53 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

That meter/service panel only comes with a bonded neutral.
The neutral bar is attached directly to the pan.
Pretty sure the two pictures are of the same panel.
It looks like an additional lug was installed in the top picture.


 
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Old 06-21-24, 07:37 PM
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Most power companies require all meter sockets to have a bypass handle. That meter socket does not have a bypass handle. Before installing make sure that meter socket is approved by your local power company.
 
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Old 06-22-24, 04:22 AM
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Thank pjmax, beats posting on reddit lol.
Okay so I take it there's no need for the screw as it's already bonded. I tried to find a similar photo but I'm going back over to work on it today and I can take a picture of exactly what I have. I don't have an extra lug at the top, just the in line neutral up there, and there's actually a grounding lug on the service side of the meter (bottom right) that I'll run the bare to, I'd never seen that before, but there's a little ko for it to get up in there.

Thanks for the heads up Tolyn, I called to ask about requirements a few days ago, there's pretty disorganized so I tried to get what info I could. They told me that I didn't need a horn bypass, is that pretty much the same thing?
 
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Old 06-22-24, 04:59 AM
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No. A horn bypass is different than a bypass lever. Photo is of a lever bypass meter.

 
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Old 06-22-24, 02:27 PM
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Ah, I see it, thanks.

I guess I was asking what is the difference in their function. Google says it's pretty much the same function, but i dont always believe what google says lol

Another forum I came across pretty much said theyre mianly used in commercial applications and rarely residential, but that doesn't mean my poco won't want one. Guess I'll call on Monday. Was hoping to get the box up this weekend though :/
 
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Old 06-22-24, 03:13 PM
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In my area bypass handles are required on both single phase (mostly residential) and three phase (mostly commercial) installations up to 400 amp.

A horn bypass requires the meter tech to install jumper wires in order to bypass the meter which is not nearly as safe as just the operation the bypass handle which is why most power companies require them.

You can likely find the info you are looking for online. Who is your power company?
 
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Old 06-22-24, 05:04 PM
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In my area of NJ.... we have GPU Energy/Jersey Central power.
They do not require a handle on single phase. They spec horn bypass.
I believe they do on 3 phase services.
 
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Old 06-23-24, 10:38 AM
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I scoured the website, they don't provide much. They only serve like 4 counties along the east coast. Yesterday an electrician set up a new service for a our new neighbors that just brought a mobile home on their property, so I checked his out. No bypass. I think we're good on that.
However we've ran into a new problem. We set the pole this morning by hand just the two of us and a tired riding mower lol. We dug a trench to lay the end of it in and as we set it up it drug in a foots worth of dirt and sand from the trench into the hole. So we're a foot too high. The only thing I can think to do, having no machinery is to screw in some long 2x4s to keep it in place and dig a new hole right beside it and walk it over into the new hole that will be a foot deeper. Unless any one had any other ideas? I would hate to have to try to pull it out and reset it, not sure we have the manpower for the that one.
 
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Old 06-23-24, 02:34 PM
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Not following.... a foot too long ?
 
 

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