Whirlpool wall oven in 20 y/o house

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  #1  
Old 09-24-01, 11:40 AM
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Question

Last night I installed a new Whirlpool double electric wall oven in our 20-year-old house. Existing wiring was three-conductor: a black, white, and ground. The oven's wiring was: black, red, and a white wire connected to a ground wire, which can apparently be separated for 4-conductor wiring.

I connected black to black, red (oven) to white (wall), and white/ground (oven) to ground (wall). That seems to work fine (so far). Did I screw up?

Also, the cable coming into the cabinet enclosure is encased with the usual insulation (it is not in a flexible metal conduit, as the oven's wiring is). Is there a danger that the oven's heat will melt the insulation? (The junction box is inside the enclosure, above the oven). What about that paper wrapped around the ground inside the cable?

Thanks in advance for any help. The wiring problem seems pretty simple on its face, but I don't want to create a safety hazard in my house.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-24-01, 01:40 PM
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Existing wiring was three-conductor: a black, white, and ground

TX5, what size wire is this? , was it previously connected to an oven?
 
  #3  
Old 09-24-01, 04:07 PM
Wgoodrich
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Also beyond what wirenuts said, what type cable is the existing branch circuit serving that oven. Is this cable type NMB or is this existing cable an SE type cable. If this cable is not an SE type cable with the bare wrapping as a web around the two hots within that existing cable then you will have to run a new cable to serve that oven and only if that existing branch circuit originates at the main service rated panel and not a sub panel. to meet the NEC as per 250-140-3.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
  #4  
Old 09-25-01, 02:18 AM
resqcapt19
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WG,
If the exisiting cable is NM and has 3 insulated conductors it is ok. Older NM cable was available with a black, a red, and a white. These would all be insulated conductors and meet the requirement of 250-140. If the cable is NM and and has only 2 insulated and a bare conductor there would be a violation.
Don(resqcapt19)
 
  #5  
Old 09-25-01, 03:17 AM
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Smile

Thanks for the replies. The new, double oven is installed where an oven/microwave combo was installed before. Obviously, I'm no expert, but the wires are extremely thick (8 gauge?). It is on its own 50 amp, 240 volt circuit. (We replaced the microwave with a countertop model with a dedicated 20 amp circuit.)

Unfortunately, the cable does appear to have only two very well insulated hots and a ground wrapped in paper in between. On the other hand, the electrician who added the new microwave circuit (and another for the refrigerator) looked at the cable to the oven and said it was OK for the double oven. (We did not have the new cabinets in at the time, or I would have just had him hook up the oven.) I was more concerned about oven heat inside the enclosure than heat from the current in the wires, but that may just be my ignorance.

How do I tell NM cable from SE cable? (I'm in Houston, TX, if that helps.)
 
  #6  
Old 09-25-01, 04:11 AM
resqcapt19
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WG,
I'm sorry, I miised the part of the original post that said the ground was wrapped in paper. That would make it 2 conductor with ground and as you stated it would be a violation.

TX5,
The SE cable will have a bare conductor wrapped around the outside of the other two conductors. All of this will be covered with an overall jacket.

Don(resqcapt19)
 
  #7  
Old 09-25-01, 10:18 AM
Wgoodrich
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resqcapt19, if the post had said a black, red, and white insulated NMB cable you would be right. I understand that you missed the cable he discribed not having the three insulated conductors. I just wanted to mention that what you are saying is right considering a cable with an insulated ground conductor in that cable if NMB type cable. As I remember this installation design was rare in this area. However someone may benifit from what you said if they have the three insulated cables as you discribed. I was dealing with the specific condition of this post. I neglected to mention what you said in my original reply. If someone reads this later on that knowledge is available, so your statement is possibly benificial to someone in the future that may read this post.

You were right in your statement, just missed the cable discription in this post.

Wg
 
  #8  
Old 09-25-01, 10:25 AM
Wgoodrich
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resqcapt19, if the post had said a black, red, and white insulated NMB cable you would be right. I understand that you missed the cable he discribed not having the three insulated conductors. I just wanted to mention that what you are saying is right considering a cable with an insulated ground conductor in that cable if NMB type cable. As I remember this installation design was rare in this area. However someone may benifit from what you said if they have the three insulated cables as you discribed. I was dealing with the specific condition of this post. I neglected to mention what you said in my original reply. If someone reads this later on that knowledge is available, so your statement is possibly benificial to someone in the future that may read this post.

You were right in your statement, just missed the cable discription in this post.

Wg
 
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