electrical formula

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-24-01, 09:55 AM
psaint
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
In calculating the conversion of electrical current I ran into a term I don't understand; PS > W. It is a conversion from something to Watts. Anyone know what the PS stands for?
 
  #2  
Old 10-24-01, 10:13 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The power,measured in watts of an A.C. circuit is volts x amperes (current) x Power Factor (P.F.). Are we close?
 
  #3  
Old 10-24-01, 05:52 PM
psaint
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Close, but no cigar. Thanks for the reply, but this was part of a table that makes the conversion of various standards from one factor to another, i.e. HP (horse power)to W (Watts). HP > W. I was looking for the meaning of the PS > W.
 
  #4  
Old 10-25-01, 09:30 AM
Wgoodrich
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I am along with Switchman, I am drawing a blank in the initials of PS. It does stick in my mind that there is a formal concerning power versus series circuit that may be along the line of the PS initials. Maybe John Nelson can remember this one. I have nothing on record for calculating a series circuit in specialty application.

However you might look at the data below. I believe Switchman to be closer than you original thought.
Try the following and see if any hits home for you;

PF = Power factor which is the ratio between the power in watts, and the apparent power in volt-amps. Power factor is normally expressed in percentages

W = Watts, which is a unit of electrical power of the rate that a form of energy [work performed]. A unit measure of power.

VA = Volt amps which is the electric current that will flow through one ohm under the pressure of an applied voltage.



Volt Amperes = Watts divided by the power factor.

If carefully said, and in general (Laymanís) terms, volt amperes and watts are generally the same, unless dealing with electronics.

VA = W or watts divided by power factor.
PF

Watts = W = VA x PF or volt amperes multiplied by the power factor

In construction the watts and volt amps make little difference. In electronics it makes a big difference.

Hope you find what you are looking for;

Wg
 
  #5  
Old 10-25-01, 10:45 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sorry, I have no clue.

One watt equals:
  • 0.001 kilowatt
  • 0.0013410 horse power
  • 0.0013596 horse power (metric) or cheval vapeur
  • 0.01433 kilogram-calorie (mean) per minute
  • 0.056896 BTU (mean) per minute
  • 0.73756 foot-pound per second
  • 1 joul per second
  • 44.254 foot-pounds per minute
  • 1x10^7 ergs per second.
Nothing in that list looks like PS to me.

More context around this might be helpful. For example, I'm not even sure whether the ">" is meant to mean "greater than" or if it is some sort of arrow.
 
  #6  
Old 10-25-01, 11:37 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Possibly picosecond. The "Standard Handbook for Electrical Engineers" lists p for pico, pF for picofarad and pW for picowatt.These are symbols for Units not to be confused with symbols for quantities(unless I'm confused).Refer to this book and "knock you self out" with researching symbols.
 
  #7  
Old 10-25-01, 12:12 PM
Trying2Help's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 746
Received 7 Votes on 4 Posts
PS ??????

Ok, you got my interest peaked. The closest thing I can come up with is this:

power density
Characteristic parameter of a battery indicating its electrical power per unit weight or volume. The terminology is not strictly defined. Weight based power density is often called "specific power" or "gravimetric power density." Volume based power density is often called "power density" or "volumetric power density. The power density is typically expressed as watt/kilogram or watt/liter.

The reference it makes to "specific power" could be defined as "Power Specific" or PS?????

Do you have an example of the conversion? Numbers or something to go on here?
 
  #8  
Old 10-25-01, 02:29 PM
psaint
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Electrical Formula

Eureka! Thanks to WGoodrich, John Nelson and Trying2Help for their response. John Nelson hit the nail on the head by providing conversion factors for one (1) watt. One Watt is equal to .001359619 metric horsepower. Trying2Help took us a step further in providing the definition of Power Density and the possible use of the term for this as "Power Specific." I could have simplified this process by providing the conversion factor,"which I was trying to define, if I had included it in the first Post. Now to complete the circle: 1 metric HP = 735.5 Watts. Thanks to everybody.
 
  #9  
Old 10-26-01, 05:59 AM
Trying2Help's Avatar
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 746
Received 7 Votes on 4 Posts
Talking

I don't know about the rest of you, but I know I will sleep better tonight.
If I may ask, did you need to use this conversion for something, or were you just trying to figure out what PS refered to?
 
  #10  
Old 10-26-01, 09:10 AM
psaint
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
electrical formula

It was part of a problem posed to me by a maintenance engineer working on a project. I wasn't sure if I had the factor or not.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: