3-wire from wall switch to 2-wire light cord???

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-02-01, 05:23 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question

I am installing some lighting that looked to me as though I would be able to connect it directly to my light switch. So, I have the wire from my light switch ready (white, black, ground). However, the cord for the new halogen lights has only two wires to connect (1 smooth and 1 ribbed). Am I up a creek, or can I connect the ground with the neutral?

Your help is appreciated, especially as all my friends are asleep. :-)

Dwaine
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-02-01, 07:06 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Absolutely do not connect the ground and neutral. This would be a terrible mistake.

Your new light fixture apparently has no grounding wire. Are you mounting this fixture to an electrical box (you cannot really mount it directly to the light switch)? Is this electrical box metal? If so, you should attach your grounding wire to the box.

The ribbed wire on your light fixture should be connected to the white wire from the switch, and the smooth wire to the black.

If the light fixture is designed to be connected with a plug, you should not be hard wiring it.
 
  #3  
Old 11-03-01, 04:12 AM
Wgoodrich
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I also have a concern about this light fixture. Hologen lights come in a variety of voltages. Make sure and read the instructions and the name plate rating of that fixture to make sure you are installing the right voltage to this light fixture as it is rated. It may be 120 volts or 240 volts or 12 volts or 16 volts. If you connect the wrong voltage to this light you at the least won't have a light left that will operate again.

Be careful

Wg
 
  #4  
Old 11-03-01, 04:35 AM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Explanation

Okay,

It is a series of three very small round halogen lights. Each light has a connector that connects to a series of connectors after the power supply. Begore the power supply is the cord I described earlier (one ribbed / one smooth). There is no place to ground the light.

I am going to keep the grounding wire in its sheeth while connecting/vrimping the other wires to eachother.

D
 
  #5  
Old 11-03-01, 07:02 AM
Wgoodrich
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I have a very strong feeling that these lights are supposed to be powered by a low voltage transformer. Do not energize these lights until you take them back to the supplier and clarify whether these lights are low voltage lights or not. Right now I believe they are low voltage lights designed to be power from a step down transformer. If you power these lights with 120 or more you may be setting up a severe fire or shock hazard.

Be sure what you are doing before energizing these lights.

Wg
 
  #6  
Old 11-03-01, 07:17 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wg, I think the "power supply" referred to by stroudbunch is the transformer you are looking for. Is this true, stroudbunch?
 
  #7  
Old 11-03-01, 08:32 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thumbs up Transformer

Hey guys (and gals)

The "powersupply" was indeed a transformer.

I connected the black and white wires correctly, then left the ground wire from the light switch in its sheeth.

The lights are working great.

D.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: