Lost all power

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-17-01, 06:27 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: CANADA
Posts: 298
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Lost all power

When I turned on my table saw in my shop today, I lost all power in the shop. The individual fuses seem OK, but when I opened the switch box (this is a separate 60A subpanel)I found a mouse with one hand on a terminal-very dead.

The breaker in the house for this circuit did not trip. In the switch box are 2 Type D, 35A fuses. Is there a way to determine if this type of fuse is blown? Would like to avoid making a trip into town (weather is real bad right now), to buy replacement fuses, only to find out the 2 I have are OK, and the problem lies elsewhere.

All advice appreciated.

Tom
 
  #2  
Old 12-17-01, 09:34 AM
Wgoodrich
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
YOu will need to remove the fuse from where it is installed and use a continuity tester to confirm there is a path for the electricity through the fuse.

IF you have a voltage tester and you have two main connections the check between line 1 and line 2 on the load side of the two fuses to see that you have 220 volts.

If you are testing a round screw in fuse with a voltage tester then test for voltage between that screw for that fuse to the neutral bar. IF you get 120 volts that you should be fine unless this branch circuit is a 220 volt branch circuit using two fuses for the banch circuit. If you have a 220 volt branch circuit then you need to remove the wire from the fuse to test that fuse screw to the neutral bar or you will get a feed back and a false reading from the second fuse.

Be sure to check for 220 volts between the two main lugs in that garage panel. If you don't have the 220 volts between the two main lugs and you have a 220 volt service in your garage then go back to you house panel and turn the breaker off feeding that garage hard to the off position and then turn that breaker back on. Often times a breaker looks fine but is tripped.

Hope this helps

wg
 
  #3  
Old 12-18-01, 08:17 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: CANADA
Posts: 298
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank-you wg!

Didn't have a continuity tester so I placed each of the large Type D fuses, in turn, on the positive terminal of a 12 volt battery, then hooked up negative lead of spotlight to battery and touched positive lead to top of fuse. 1 worked, the other didn't. Bought a new fuse and my power is restored.

Question, though- the fuse that was blown was the one on the side of the switchbox where the mouse was in contact with the terminal and the switchbox cover. Was it co-incidence that the fuse blew exactly when I turned on the saw, or would the mouse have had something to do with this?

Again, thanks for your help.

Tom
 
  #4  
Old 12-18-01, 01:30 PM
Wgoodrich
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I would say the mouse got fried and the fuse didn't even notice it. Possible that it may have blown the fuse but most likely the inrush of starting that table saw may have blown the fuse. This fuse may have been starting that saw or sawing under heavy load to the point of pushing the fuse to the edge of blowing. Then when you started the saw again the inrush [big amps taken to start the saw] or the saw may have had a piece of wood dragging on the saw as it started. If the saw is working fine I would say the fuse may have just given out due to heavy sawing over time or due to the starting of the motor being increased due to a piece of wood dragging the start of that motor down.

Good Luck

Wg
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: