Telephone & Coax Cable

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Old 01-26-02, 05:54 AM
coreyclark
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Telephone & Coax Cable

Is there any "code" for where telephone jacks and cable outlets must be similar to the "any point on a wall must be within 6' of an outlet" for electrical?

If not, is there an accepted practice?

Thanks.

Corey Clark
Valparaiso, IN
 
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Old 01-26-02, 10:00 AM
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No. There is no code regulating these locations. It is customary to put cable TV outlets where it looks most logical to put the TV. This usually includes at least one spot in the family room or living room, and one spot in each bedroom (opposite where you think the bed should go).

Deciding where to put phone outlets is a similar process. Just put them where you think you will want a phone. Certainly one in the kitchen and one in each bedoom (near where you think the bed belongs). A commonly overlooked spot is in the family room opposite where the TV will be, near the easy chair. Be sure to also put a phone line near where you think any desk would be (for phone and computer). For computer use, run separate cat5 or better cables directly from the desk area to the network interface box. For voice, you can daisy-chain the jacks.

If you ever want a cable modem, then put a cable outlet near desk areas too.

Bottom line: common sense is your guide.
 
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Old 01-26-02, 11:10 AM
coreyclark
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Originally posted by John Nelson

For computer use, run separate cat5 or better cables directly from the desk area to the network interface box. For voice, you can daisy-chain the jacks.

Bottom line: common sense is your guide.
Could you expand on this statement. I am unclear on this point.

Thanks.

Corey
 
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Old 01-26-02, 03:35 PM
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I'm not entirely clear on what you need me to expand on. But let's take it point by point.
  • cat5 or better. Regular phone cord is fine for voice lines. This typically has four wires (red, green, black and yellow) that are untwisted. This wiring hasn't really been common for many years, but it is still sold and still exists in older homes. The biggest drawback is that it can only handle two phone lines (originally, it handled only one). cat3 wire is in twisted pairs and hence less vulnerable to electrical or magnetic interference. cat5 is marginally more expensive than cat3 and has more twists. cat3 and cat5 are typically sold in four pairs, and thus can handle up to four phone lines. Newer stuff is cat5e or cat6. All of these are less susceptible to interference, and thus are capable of greater data speeds with less retransmissions. cat5 or better should be used on all data lines (Internet connections and home networking). However, cat3 is usually okay for 56K modem traffic.
  • directly. A "home run" (i.e., not stopping at any other jacks) has only one connection on each end and also makes it less susceptible to interference that may degrade data speeds. However, voice traffic usually doesn't mind the extra jacks in the line.
  • daisy-chain. This refers to running the cable from the phone box to one jack and then from there to the next jack and so forth. It is the opposite of "home run".
  • common sense. I'll leave this to you.
 
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