two breakers

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Old 02-05-02, 05:08 PM
bigjoe
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two breakers

Can anyone help?

If I need to install a breaker at each end of a circuit to a range, (a local electrical place told me this), what is the proper wiring and how far can the sencond breaker be from the appliance? Are these breakers just wired in line with each other, if so how does this help protect the circuit more than just one breaker?
Thanks in advance for any help!
 
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Old 02-05-02, 06:15 PM
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You are probably refering to a two pole circuit breaker (two individual cirucit breakers stuck on top of each other, with the handles connected by the manufacturer). These go into the panel on different phases.
I would suggest you find a good book on basic wiring for pictures and a better description.
 
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Old 02-05-02, 06:49 PM
bigjoe
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Hi HandyRon,
I do know about 230v 2 pole breakers and circuits. It was suggested that besides the breaker at the main pannel, I also have one at the appliance. I have heard of this when the wire run is a long one, but I have never had to put one in. As I understand it, it would be a 40 amp 230v 2 pole breaker in the main panel, 3 conducters plus ground running to another single breaker box with a 40 amp 230v 2 pole breaker and then the appliance recept, then the appliance cord to the range. Have you ever hear of this, or how it works?
 
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Old 02-06-02, 06:23 AM
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For a range, a local breaker or disconenct is not required. I don't believe that I have ever seen it done.
A local disconenct is required for motor type appliances, etc.
 
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Old 02-06-02, 06:50 AM
bigjoe
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That's what I thought. I guess I'll have to do some more research and ask some more questions. Thanks for your help, I truly appreciate it.
 
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Old 02-06-02, 09:11 AM
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Call your local inspection office and ask them it may be some sort of local bylaw. In most cases you require the breaker in the panel and a disconnection means at the appliance which is usually a receptacle.
Maybe he was talking about that.
But if not sure about a method of installation that is strange call your local inspectors they know all the bylaws for your area.
 
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Old 02-06-02, 09:57 AM
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Art 422.34 -Unit Switch(es) as Disconnecting Means reads: "Unit switch(es) with a marked OFF position (that) dis-connects all un-grounded conductors shall be permitted as the dis-connecting means (if others means are provided)- (C) one-family dwellings, the service dis-connect shall be permitted to be the other dis-connecting means"
 
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