installing a 220 outlet

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  #1  
Old 03-08-02, 08:07 AM
thenewguy
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installing a 220 outlet

Hey guys, it's me again. Got that last problem fixed! All is great now, but I need to install a 220 outlet in my garage for my welder. I understand how to wire from the box etrc...but do have a question with that as well. In a typical 220 circuit, is only one outlet allowed from each? Or is this different from the typical 110 setup? I noticed many are wired outside, like right where the power comes in, yet some run right from the box. Just trying to decide how best to do this thing. Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 03-08-02, 08:30 AM
G
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How many outlets you can run on a 220v circuit will depend on what you intend to run on it and if two items are to be used at the same time let us know what your going to use it for.
 
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Old 03-09-02, 07:29 AM
thenewguy
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Hey thanks for the reply. As far as putting a 220 outlet in the garage, I would be using it only for the welder. The main panel in the household runs only the dryer on the 220 installed there.
Niether would be used at the same time intentionally, but it could happen. I do know that welder pulls a lot of juice, and it's been known to trip 30 amp breakers from time to time in the house I lived in before.
 
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Old 03-09-02, 04:41 PM
G
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I'd check before using the dryer circuit for the welder too In some juristictions this is not allowed. You'd have to contact your local authority before doing it.
 
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Old 03-09-02, 10:48 PM
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I think you misread, he is saying the only other 220 circuit is his dryer in the house.
 
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Old 03-10-02, 10:09 AM
G
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Thanks I guess I did misread, thats what I get for staring at a computer screen when I should of been in bed with the flue.

You can set up a separtate circuit for your welder if it requires a 30amp two pole breaker then it would require #10 awg you could put two or three convenience outlets on the circuit as long as the intendion is all outlets are to run the same welder, to cut down the necessity of using extendion cords. Now if this welder trips thirty amp breakers maybe it is too large for one.

What is the nameplate rating on it does it say use a 30 amp circuit or does it say the welder draws 30 amps if it does draw 30 amps we are suppose to calculate the wire size and breaker to compensate for a load of 80% of their ability. Which would mean 80% of 30 amps is only 24 Amps if your drawing more then that go to a 40 amp breaker and #8 wire. The large wire heats keep the heat from building along the circuit. 125% of 30amps is 37.5 amps the next available breaker is 40 amp. So check carefully as to what this unit needs for power then you should be all right.

The next thing is you say this will be in you garage is this and attached garage? If it is then you shouldn't have much to worry about but is it isn't then how you get there and the type of cabling you use will play an important part of what your doing.

I'm not sure of your reference to many run ooutside (of what) and many from the box are you speaking of a receptacle and hardwiring, You can do either but if your going to be moving the welder around to use other outlets then you should use a receptacle for this. The type of receptacle and cord end will depend if your welder is a 220v with or without neutral and if it is 30 amp or 40amps.

Plug and play for this application is most likely the best. It would provide you with easy disconnect and much more safety. Direct connections can get a little sticky as some jurisdictions require a means of disconnect within veiw of the equipment other jurisdictions don't seem to care about it for at home use.

I hope this answers your questions post back and let me know if these cleared things up for you or if I just confused you.
 
  #7  
Old 03-10-02, 10:34 PM
thenewguy
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Hey thanks a lot! I really appreciate the info. I'm more on the right track now. I just moved in recently over here, and still learning about the wiring around here. The box outside is using bus non 50 (pull off) fuses, with 2 pull offs, each containing two from what I could see. From there it runs to the main in the house. the main has 2 30 amp breakers, and distributes from there to the rest of the house. Looks to me like there will be plenty of work involved on this one, so for now it will be a matter of planning out a method of attack.
Once again, thank you very much for the information. Now all I have to wait for is some motivation!
 
  #8  
Old 03-11-02, 07:46 AM
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If you only have a small service such as your describing I would suggest you upgrade the load your using is going to be trouble in the long run Even if you only go to a 100 amp service.
 
  #9  
Old 03-11-02, 06:09 PM
thenewguy
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I definately agree with that. It's the only realistic option available for me. The system I have now is probably pushed to the max just to run the house! It still uses the old buss fuses as well. i think I seen 4 non 50 amps in the box outside. It's those pull off deals with 2 buss non 50's in each one. Looks like I'm really in for it on this one, but this system is just to shotty for what I need.
 
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