Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Electrical, AC & DC. Electronic Equipment and Computers > Electrical - AC & DC
Reload this Page >

Need Clarification re ground wiring in electrical rough-in with plastic boxes

Need Clarification re ground wiring in electrical rough-in with plastic boxes

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-12-02, 08:14 PM
charlieA
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Need Clarification re ground wiring in electrical rough-in with plastic boxes

Hi All

This is a first time post for me, but from what I can see, see this an excellent resource.

Helped a friend do an electrical rough in last week. The inspector passed the job, but commented that he wanted to see some type of grounding clips (my words not his) used for the final inspection. Do any of you real experienced folks have some wisdom you can share on this??

Thanks for your help

CharlieA
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-13-02, 03:17 AM
joeh20
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
grounding clips

Need a little more info here. How did you connect your grounds in you boxes. Did you use green wire nuts with a hole in them, did you use a copper ferrule and crimp the wires together. Did you put more than one ground wire under the green screw on an outlet. did you pigtail your wires out of the plastic box to recieve an outlet. If I know some of what you did maybe I can figure out what he meant. Some inspectors may seem a little vague if you don't work with them often. But generally they just want you to have a safe and useful installation, just takes a while to get the terminology down.
I'll be back on around 10:00 am CDT
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-02, 07:16 AM
charlieA
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi Joe

Thx for responding.

I was not there when the inspection was made, so the info is second hand.

At the this point of the inspection, all we had was the unstripped Romex hanging out of the boxes.

I gather from my conversation with my son-in-law, the inspector was talking of what I think you described as the ferrule and crimp method for grounding.

Appreciate your input.

Charlie
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-02, 07:25 AM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: port chester n y
Posts: 2,117
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If by "un-stripped romex" you mean the individual wires were still concealed by the cable jacket,I conclude you were fortunate in having a lenient inspector who approved the wiring.Most inspectors emphasize equiptment grounding conductor connections that comply with the Code.
 
  #5  
Old 03-13-02, 08:16 AM
joeh20
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
grounding clips

CharlieA what we do in TN is bring one ground wire out 6 or 7 inches longer than the other one and with linemans pliers twist them together. then slide a copper ferrule over the twist and crimp it down with the pliers. they make a tool to crimp these but we haven't had to buy one yet. This works for one utility where i do most of my work. The other utility in this area prefers a green wire nut with a hole in it. But the inspector that looks at most of work says that the ferrule is a true mechanical fastener and he seems to think this is the intent of the code. i have seen wire nuts with a set screw in the side of them but never used then in a residental situation. I think they would satisfy the mechanical requirement. but are primarily used in areas of excessive vibration as an industrial enviroment might incur. Although I am licensed I only wire part time so some of the regulars on here might be of more assistance.
 
  #6  
Old 03-14-02, 05:27 AM
abNORMal's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 536
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
charlieA:

What the inspector wants to see is proof that you intend to ground the entire circuit and each device in the circuit. As stated by others, there are a few different methods you can use.

What you want to do is, at each box, tie all grounds together, leaving pigtails or wire lengths for each switch or receptacle to be installed there.

So, at a double-gang box intended for two duplex outlets for instance, with power in and a feed to another box, you would tie the 2 grounds together with 2 6-inch pigtails, one for each receptacle. If it is a metal box, you would include a 3rd 6-inch pigtail and screw it to the box.

If he were to test for adequate grounding, he should be able to put one test lead on the bare wire intended to go to the panel ground bus and the other test lead on any bare wire or metal in any circuit and get continuity. This (among other things) is what the inspector expects to see at the rough.
 
  #7  
Old 03-14-02, 06:32 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Not all inspectors allow you to crimp the ferrule with ordinary pliers. I've seen an inspector make an electrian redo an entire house because he did so. The green wire nuts are easier to use for the DIYer.
 
  #8  
Old 04-13-02, 12:51 AM
lars3159
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Do all the ground wires need to be bonded together if they are from seperate circuits? Or do you just bond together the grounds from the different circuits?
Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 04-13-02, 04:44 AM
Jxofaltrds
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Connect all the grounds. Keep neutrals of seperate circuits seperate.
 
  #10  
Old 04-14-02, 05:08 PM
R . Pennacchio
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Exclamation

keep all gr. together except, when you have a g.f.i circut in the same box. other wise the gfi will pick up a fault
 
  #11  
Old 04-14-02, 05:24 PM
amp-man
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
GFI grounding?

R. Pennacchio--

I can't see how splicing the equipment grounding conductors from separate circuits together would affect a GFI. That's what we're talking abut here, the EGCs, NOT the grounded conductors (neutrals). The only use of the EGC by a GFI is when you push the "TEST" button. An EGC is not needed for operation of the GFI, so your comment puzzles me.

But I'm always open to hear new information. Is your comment based on direct experience? If so please describe.

Waiting to learn,

Cliff
 
  #12  
Old 04-15-02, 05:33 PM
R . Pennacchio
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Re: GFI grounding?

Originally posted by amp-man
R. Pennacchio--

I can't see how splicing the equipment grounding conductors from separate circuits together would affect a GFI. That's what we're talking abut here, the EGCs, NOT the grounded conductors (neutrals). The only use of the EGC by a GFI is when you push the "TEST" button. An EGC is not needed for operation of the GFI, so your comment puzzles me.

But I'm always open to hear new information. Is your comment based on direct experience? If so please describe.

Waiting to learn,

Cliff
HI Cliff Don't know if i am doing this right but here we go
The quoite i made was form a helpre that had that problem, he said he had to isolate the gr. down stream for the gfi to hold.
I left it as that, knowling that isolated circuts grs do not have to be tied with other [in box] gr. conducters. I'll post you back tomorrow when i talk too the helper, 20yr helper
Bob
 
  #13  
Old 04-16-02, 04:49 AM
Jxofaltrds
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The problem is that a neutral is toughing a ground (other than in the panel) causing the GFCI to trip. The tripping tells you that you have a problem you normally would not find. Find the problem do not just disconnect the grounds.
 
  #14  
Old 04-16-02, 02:23 PM
R . Pennacchio
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Jxofaltrds
[B]The problem is that a neutral is toughing a ground (other than in the panel) causing the GFCI to trip. The tripping tells you that you have a problem you normally would not find. Find the problem do not just disconnect the grounds. [/B
gentlemen
I went too the job to check the kitchen circuit
and found they had the netural form the gfi circut tied together with a disposal cir. I am sorry if i miss lead any one and don't listen too your helpers
PS tied all grounds back together
bob pennacchio
 
  #15  
Old 04-16-02, 03:05 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Dry Side of Washington State
Posts: 738
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Washington state requires all grounding conductors be made up at the time of the rough-in inspection. This includes pig tails that will eventually connect to the grounding screws of devices.
 
  #16  
Old 04-16-02, 05:35 PM
Jxofaltrds
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Bob have your helpers read 310.4 2002 NEC. 99% of the electrician here do not understand this.

"I went too the job to check the kitchen circuit
and found they had the netural form the gfi circut tied together with a disposal cir. " Parallel conductors.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: