GFCI origins

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-13-02, 06:42 AM
jn
jn is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 226
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
GFCI origins

I have a house that I am selling and it was built in 1973. It has no GFCI outlets. There are outside weatherproof outlets on the house. There are also kitchen counter-top outlets within arms reach of the sink. I assume all of these are part of the original wiring which took place in 1973. I know it is easy to update these and make them safer with the install on GFCI outlets, but wonder if they are required. When were GFCI's introduced?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-13-02, 07:44 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You are under no obligation to add GFCI protection. The buyer may request it, but you don't have to add it. Assuming the house passed inspection when it was built, then it is still legal today. You can call your local building department to see when this requirement became effective in your city (it varies from place to place).

However, I assume that you are trying to increase the saleability of your home. Many homes built in 1973 do indeed have GFCI protection. At this time, it was often done with a GFCI breaker -- have you looked in the panel to see if any of your breakers are GFCI. Furthermore, many people insist they have no GFCI receptacles, but what they really mean is none that they know of -- these receptacles are sometimes located in the darndest places. A GFCI receptacle tester (about $7 at Home Depot) can easily tell you whether your bathroom receptacles are GFCI protected. Of course, if you use that tester to trip the GFCI, then you'll be forced to find it.
 

Last edited by John Nelson; 05-13-02 at 08:03 AM.
  #3  
Old 05-14-02, 07:34 AM
jn
jn is offline
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 226
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the reply John. I do have a GFCI push button tester that checks polarity etc. That was how I determined these weren't protected. The house is under contract and is getting inspected by the lending institution tommorrow. I was just going to minimize the chance of them failing anything. As it stands I think i will take my chances.
Thanks again
 
  #4  
Old 05-14-02, 08:12 AM
hotarc
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
According to Square D, they introduced the first GFCI in 1967.
 
  #5  
Old 05-14-02, 01:47 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Seattle
Posts: 233
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
hope this helps

http://forum.doityourself.com/showth...threadid=91628

See this post.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: