220 GFI protection

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  #1  
Old 05-17-02, 01:21 PM
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natebro
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Question 220 GFI protection

Does anyone have some ideas on GFI protecting a 220v circuit that is on a fuse box rather than a breaker box?

Now that I've got my irrigation pump running I am wondering about GFI protection. This pump is the only device on a 220v circuit that comes out of an old fuse style panel in the garage.

The house was built in 1953. I am planning to have an updated breaker box installed to replace the current fuse boxes. When I get the breaker box I will put in a 220v GFI breaker for the pump. In the mean time, I could use some ideas on GFI protecting a 220v circuit that is on a fuse box rather than a breaker box?
 
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Old 05-17-02, 04:39 PM
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How big is the pump (amps)? Where is it connected, that you feel that GFCI protection is needed?
If it is needed, and less than 16 amps of full load current, then feed it through a 20A GFCI receptacle.
 
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Old 05-18-02, 02:43 PM
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hope this helps

If it is needed, and less than 16 amps of full load current, then feed it through a 20A GFCI receptacle.
Its a 220v pump Ron.
Set a 2 space sub-panel next to your main panel, and put a gfi breaker in it.
 
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Old 05-18-02, 02:47 PM
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I wouldn't waste the money on a sub panel if the loads allows for a simple GFCI receptacle to protect it.
I'm not sure GFCI is needed at all anyway.
 
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Old 05-18-02, 03:20 PM
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Ron, I'm not aware of a 240-volt GFCI receptacle. Are you?
 
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Old 05-18-02, 03:28 PM
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Wgoodrich
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You will need to define or discribe the irrigation pump you are using. I doubt this is an agricultural irrigation self driven etc. I suspect this is a booster pump, normal water pump, or a fountain. Once we are sure what you have then we can tell you if it is required to be GFI protected.

Wg
 
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Old 05-18-02, 04:14 PM
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John,
I will admit that I am only aware of two, both by Leviton.
15A, 240V Cat#26592-E
& 20A, 240V Cat#36592-E

These are cord set receptacles, not box mounted receptacles.
 
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Old 05-19-02, 11:26 AM
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The pump is a "Meyers" lawn and garden pump. It's driven by a 3/4 horse GE motor. The pump is about 18 inches from the wall of my garage. I'll get back about the amperage and possibly a model number of the motor. The pump and motor are bolted directly to the well, which is a 2 inch pipe driven 20 feet into the ground.

The pump pulls out of a shallow well (13 ft. lift) and powers a few sprinklers for a horse pasture and the lawn.

My only concern with needing a GFI is that the pump needs priming periodically, creating an environment where there is a lot of water around the pump and motor.

Ron,

Where might I get these GFI chord set receptacles if I find out that I need them? None of my local hardware or electrical supply places seem to be able to help.

Nathan
 
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Old 05-19-02, 05:47 PM
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Go to an electrical supply that carries Leviton Products, and ask for the model #'s given previously. I would assume that the 240V 3/4HP motor draws about 7 amps, so either should work.

A word of caution: Motors have notoriously falsely tripped GFCI's due to somewhat normal leakage to ground.

The motor in question, in my opinion, does not require a GFCI by code, but if you want one, give it a try.
240V GFCI's seem to be comming more popular, per the article below.
http://www.electricsmarts.com/conten...nding_gfci.asp
 
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Old 05-20-02, 07:50 PM
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natebro
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The pump is rated for 4.8 amps at 240 volts.

I think that the information you've all given me has led me to the conclusion that I won't be risking much if I wait until I get a breaker box before trying to GFCI protect the circuit.

My main concern was that I have a few horses in the pasture where the pump is. They can be a little curious at times. However, the mention of motors erroneously tripping a GFCI device makes me shy from it. The pump is pretty tough to get primed and started. Once I get it going, I want to keep it running as long as I can.

Thanks for all the info. I feel like I can make an informed decision now.


Nathan
 
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Old 05-21-02, 03:12 PM
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Wgoodrich
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A GFI protection is not required for this pump motor. However if you want the added protection that a GFI device can provide then by all means install it.

I expect your pump to be direct connected with a 220 volt nonfused disconnect serving that pump in the pump area.

You should have a double pole breaker in your house or wherever the power source is located. Find that 220 volt breaker protecting the conductor in that main panel where the power feeds that motor. Buy a 220 volt double pole GFI breaker matching that panel brand and model. Install that new 220 volt GFI breaker matching the existing breaker as a replacement of the 220 volt breaker now protecting that pump.

The GFI 220 volt breaker should hold fine on that motor as long as you have no leakage causing a shock hazard from that motor. If the motor is running correctly the GFI 220 volt breaker will hold fine serving that pump motor.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
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