Receptacle boxes mounted on twisted studs

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-17-02, 03:24 PM
C
casazza
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Receptacle boxes mounted on twisted studs

I am finishing my basement and have mounted the receptacle boxes and begun wiring. I have noticed that some of the studs along the exterior wall that have been put up by the original contractor have twisted. After looking at the boxes a little more closely, they are skewed. It does not appear that they will be flush with the wall once the drywall is put up. What do electricians normally do when this happens. If I move the box to another stud, I will then have to rearrange and rewire the other boxes since some of them are exactly 12 feet apart. I could also replace the stud, but I am concerned about the exterior being nailed to those studs also (walkout basement, no concrete wall area). Are there other options?

Thanks in advance

Jim
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-17-02, 06:23 PM
J
Jxofaltrds
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
As long as your exterior finish is not stucco,brick or some similar finish, just take a hammer and move (twisting) either the top or bottom of the stud by pounding.
 
  #3  
Old 05-17-02, 07:14 PM
C
casazza
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
We have vinyl siding, but wouldn't the sheathing be nailed to the studs?

Thanks,

Jim
 
  #4  
Old 05-17-02, 09:11 PM
W
Wirenut33
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The plywood sheathing would be nailed to the studs. A fast and easy option would be to install handy boxes after the sheetrock is back up.
 
  #5  
Old 05-18-02, 09:10 AM
W
Wgoodrich
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I can think of two normal options. Leave the original stud where it is and add a new stud next to that older stud toe nailing that new stud into place then mount your box on that new stud installed aganst the older stud that is now straight.

You may also mount your recessed box using a straigh edge laying horizontal across the neighboring studs to show what straight is concering your wall covering such as drywall. Then mount your recessed box so that the leading edge of that box mounted to the twisted stud lands flush with the finished wall surface. Then drywall or otherwise finish your wall. Once all is done measure the gap that is hanging back from the surface of the finished wall to the front edge of the box front at its furthest back part. If you are no more than 1/8" gap from the front edge of that box then ignore the gap and install your device and plate. If you are more than 1/8" then buy a box extension and slip into that box so that it will take up the gap left inexcess of the 1/8" from wall surface. This will allow you to take up your angle mounted stud causing the gap.

Just be sure that any part of the box will land either flush or recessed from flush so that a box extension can straighten out hte angle of the twisted stud. DO NOT ALLOW THAT BOX TO STICK OUT BEYOND THE WALL FINISH. If you set your box so that it lands sticking out beyond the wall finished product then you have to grind that box edge back to the wall surface or your plate will not lay striaght to the wall surface. Problem with grinding the edge of the box back to flush often grinds off the threads that mount the device to the box. It is ok to be recessed a maximum of 1/8" behind the finished wall surface. Then you have the option of using a box extension to get back to the 1/8" gap and allow you some straightening options to correct a twisted stud if you need it.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
  #6  
Old 05-18-02, 10:29 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wg, I really like that idea of adding a new stud. It will not only help with the electrical boxes, it will help keep the drywall straight. Two for the price of one, and a very inexpensive and easy solution.
 
  #7  
Old 05-18-02, 12:24 PM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: port chester n y
Posts: 2,117
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Stretch a taut cord across the face of the studs to form a "line-of sight". Cut 2X4 cleats that fit snugly between the studs where the boxes are located. Fasten "1900" (4" square") metal outlet boxes to the cleats.Position the cleats so that the face of the box is parallel with the cord with a gap of 1/8". Fasten the cleats in place.There is a 10/32" tap in the back of the box for a Green Grounding screw which is used to bond the bare Grounding conductors to the metal of the box -you don't need a "jumper" to the Grounding terminal of the device with a bonded metal box.Wire-nut 8" devise leads to the branch-circuit wires to form a "closed" circuit which will avoid an open-circuit condition which occurs when the BC wires are connected directly to the devices.Good Luck!!!
 
  #8  
Old 05-18-02, 02:40 PM
W
Wgoodrich
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Patbaa, the yoke of a device is only allowed to be used under two specific installations. Either the box is metal, grounded, and is surface mounted or if the box is metal, grounded and recessed mounted but only if that yoke is a self grounding style device with a spring type grounding clip installed with the device on its yoke to maintain the connection between that self grounding type device's yoke and the metal box.

A normal receptacle is not allowed as the grounding connection of a device mounted on a recessed box unless it is a self grounding style receptacle. See Article 250.146.B.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: