Grounding Rod

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  #1  
Old 05-20-02, 01:42 PM
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Grounding Rod

If I can step on my earth grounding rod outside the house and am able to push it down with out any effort should I replace it? At 5 to 8 feet should be some what tight?

Thanks

Brian
 
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  #2  
Old 05-20-02, 03:59 PM
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Wgoodrich
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If you can step on your ground rod and the rod sink into the earth, I doubt it will ever meet the 25 ohm to ground megging limits. I have a suspicion that you do not have an adequat grounding electrode system serving that structure unless you have other grounding electrodes also serving that home like a water pipe, plate electrode, rebar or something else approved as a grounding electrode.

I would pull that rod and see if someone cut it in half or something. It does not sound right. Maybe it was installed in distrubed dirt which would be a violation of hte NEC.

Wg
 
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Old 05-20-02, 07:51 PM
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resqcapt19
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wg,
Maybe it was installed in distrubed dirt which would be a violation of hte NEC.
Can you please cite the code section that covers this? Thanks.
Don
 
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Old 05-21-02, 03:28 PM
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Wgoodrich
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resqcapt19, I remember but I can't find the reference to disturbed dirt other than megging 25 ohms requirment. Sorry that one I will have to eat as a mistake. Can't find the rule anymore.

Wg
 
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Old 05-22-02, 09:33 PM
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Wirenut33
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I've lost count of the number of ground rods i've installed over the years, and it is not at all uncommon in some areas to have soft soil conditions. I've had places where i could literally push 5-6 feet of the electrode into the ground with minimal effort, although under these circumstances i usually install a second rod, regardless of other grounding means. Two rods are also a requirement in my locale for new construction.
 
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Old 05-26-02, 01:32 PM
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this is probably a disturbed earth installation. Rod is about 8 inches from basement wall. I know there was more then 3 inches of space back filled once the wall was cured. btw- this is at the top of the wall. 8 feet+ of fill was needed to fill up the space. I know this because most of my yard is ROCK and very hard clay. I guess I will be moving this rod away from the house a few more feet.

thanks for the info. Have put in a few rods at a power plant a few years ago and remember it being a big pain to drive those 10' rods with sledges. thats why I thought it was odd that mine just seemed to melt into the ground.

Brian
 
  #7  
Old 05-27-02, 01:10 PM
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Wgoodrich
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Try taking a 1 1/2" rigid pipe about 3' long, screw on a cap at the end of that pipe and melt some lead that would fill that pipe's end about 5". Pour the melten lead into the pipe to lay against the capped end. Let it cool. You now have a post driver that can be used to drive you ground rods by sliding that pipe over the rod and pound the rod into the ground till the post driver hits the ground, then turn the post driver over and pound the rod the rest of the way into the ground.

Better yet rent a heavy duty pneumatic or electric driven hammer drill. Place the hammer drill onto the end of the ground rod and let the hammer drill do your work driving the rod into the ground. This is the tool most often used to bust up concrete or drill concrete with larger bits.

Have fun

Wg
 
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