Replacing Electrical Outlets

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  #1  
Old 05-26-02, 06:36 PM
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randym113
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Question Replacing Electrical Outlets

I'm attempting to install some new electrical outlets in my kitchen. The ones in there are in pretty bad shape and I have a couple questions.

I'm trying to replace 3 electrical outlets. I bought one GFCI outlet and 2 regular outlets.

1) Is it correct that I would only need 1 GCFI on a circuit?

Secondly, all my outlets have this 3rd red wire. I installed one regular outlet and wired in same configuration as existing outlet and circuit blew. From reading other posts, I believe this can be corrected by cutting out metal tab between brass screws, as there is no tab on existing outlet.

My other issue is with installing the GFCI outlet.

2) The GFCI outlet doesn't have any tabs and the two brass screws are placed rather far apart. Are the two screws being connected inside the outlet? Will this work in my configuration?

On one portion of outlet it is indicated as Load and other end as Line.

3) Do I connect Black and White to line and Red to Load?

Thanks for the help?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-26-02, 07:47 PM
M
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It sounds like you have split wired recps. in your kitchen Is the breaker your turning off a double breaker? Donot under any circumstance connect the red wire to the load screw of your GFI. I'm not aware of any GFI recps made for a split wire opening. What you'll have to do if they trully are split wired (and is the safest for a DIYer) is to use 3 GFI's, bury the red wire at the first recp. bury the Black at the second and use the least loaded wire for the 3rd recp. Only connect wires to the terminals marked Line
 
  #3  
Old 05-26-02, 08:12 PM
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randym113
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yes, the breaker for the kitchen is a double breaker. what does this indicate? the wiring was done 12 years ago. for what reason would it have been split wired?

since i don't quite trust my skills for installing non-standard wiring for the GFCI outlet, are there any gotchas for just replacing the 3 outlets with regular non-GFI outlets. when installing one, it didn't just throw the circuit for my double breaker, it blew the circuit at the meter. i put the old outlet back and no problems. does it make sense that the copper tab was removed on original outlet for the split wired configuration? will try when i get some daylight to install removed tab on new outlet, but just want to double check.

Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 05-27-02, 04:56 PM
M
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You said:

yes, the breaker for the kitchen is a double breaker. what does this indicate? the wiring was done 12 years ago. for what reason would it have been split wired?

The double breaker tells me you have 2-20a circuits going to each outlet, and that the original recps. were split wired. When you put on the new outlet you caused a dead short between the 2 circuits and the fault current was large enough to trip the main.

There were split wired so that you could plug in a toaster and coffee pot into the same recp without having to worry about tripping a circuit since each side of the old recp had it's own circuit.

I'd put in the GFI's but only use one circuit at each location. Wirenut the unused wire and bury it in the box If for example one recp will have a toaster and microwave on it and the second circuit only has a coffeepot then put the third recp on the least loaded circuit
 
  #5  
Old 05-27-02, 06:05 PM
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Wgoodrich
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I might be corrected on this statement because I am not sure a split 120 / 120 dual circuit design will work without a reaction to this GFI but you might try removing the jumper between the two brass screws on your receptacles, connect the red wire to the top screw and the black wire to the bottom screw making sure the two brass screws are separated. Then install a 220 volt 20 amp GFI breaker on that multiwire branch circuit using a common neutral and two hot lines of opposite phases.

Problem is I can't remember if the 220 volt GFI is compatible to two separated 120 volt circuits being pulled on it without reacting.

I would appreciate help on this suggestion if anyone has tried the 220 GFI breaker feeding two 120 split circuits using the common neutral conductor. Not sure the 220 volt GFI breaker will acccept split load of not, can't remember.

You really need at least two 120 volt 20 amp circuits serving your receptacles over your kitchen counter. This may be an option if that 220 Volt GFI breaker will accept the split circuits.

Curious

Wg
 
  #6  
Old 05-27-02, 06:27 PM
J
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Randy,

Please tell us if you are in Canada, the U.S., or some place else. I can't help thinking you might live in Canada.
 
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