Electric Range Wiring

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  #1  
Old 06-18-02, 11:25 PM
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jask16
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Cool Electric Range Wiring

I am installing an electric range in my kitchen. At the advice of a local electrician, I have run 6/3 wire from the breaker box to the underside of the cabinet where the range top will be. The idea behind using the 6 instead of 8 was that the kitchen could later be upgraded with an oven/range combo unit. I was planning on using a 40amp breaker for the circuit. I was also informed that new NEC code regulations require that no wire junctions be used between the breaker box and the range. The range is old, and has a metal armoured 10/3 set of wires that stretch about three feet coming out of the range. There seems to be no way to get the 6 awg wire into the range itself and onto the terminal screws. How should I connect this? And also, can I find a wire nut that can merge a 6awg with a 10 safely? Thanks a lot.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-19-02, 10:42 AM
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NEC Art. 210.19, (3),Household Ranges and Cooking Appliances,Exception No. 1 reads------"Tap conductors supplying electric ranges---- from a 50 amp. branch-circuit shall have an ampacity of not less than 20 and shall be sufficient for the load (and) not longer than necessary-----" This would apply to your #6-to-#10 connection and obviously permits a connection between the appliance and the breaker. You can use a # 6 bolt-type connector for the splice/tap.Good Luck!!!
 
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Old 06-19-02, 10:47 PM
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Wgoodrich
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Patbaa, I am not sure if you misread the question or used the wrong code. I believe the 10/3 that was spoke of was the appliance conductors allowed under the rules for appliances. I would not consider this as a tap but an appliance connection I think the post meant the 10/3 armoured cable was the wires coming from the appliance rather than a tap to a second appliance. The connection is still allowed in a junciton box but not as a tap but as an appliance connection.

Wg
 
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Old 06-20-02, 11:22 AM
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Wgoodrich: I definitely did not "use the wrong code"---I used the National Electrical Code!!!!!(ha ha). Right Code,Wrong Article(or interpretation) is a different issue!!-------You mention an "appliance connection", which in my opinion is indefinite. A dryer cord-plug in a receptacle, a wire-nut splice to a dish-washer,and wires on a range terminal block are all "appliance connections". The tap conductors permitted by 210.19 are the conductors between the appliance and the tap point.(My interpretation)If these are not the tap conductors refered to please explain why.Possibly you could give an example of a range tap as permitted by 210.19.-----You state-"the Post meant the 10/3 AC was wires from the appliance (factory-installed lead?), not a tap to a 2nd appliance." I'm curious as to why you mention a "tap to a 2nd. appliance" when all JASK has is a 6/3 Branch-Circuit cable and a range with a 10/3 lead. Basic Q?-Does 210.19 permit connecting a #10 range lead to a #6 Branch-Circuit conductor which is protected by a 50 amp breaker?-----thanks for the reply-we can all benefit from the discussions.-- Cheers, Proud and Thankful-----
 
  #5  
Old 06-21-02, 03:02 PM
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Wgoodrich
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PattBaa, I don't know that I am disagreeing with what you are saying but the rule that you mentioned is really designed to allow a 20 amp 12 awg conductor to be tapped from a 60 amp range branch circuit with that tap making it a dual use branch circcuit serving more than one appliance such as an 8 awg to a free standing range from that junction box and also a 12 awg running to a cook top sizing the branch circuit as two appliances required to be sized by 220.19 for two cooking appliances. That rule you were quoting calls for the conductors in that flexible metal conduit between that junction box to be sized equal to the amp rating of that applaince. For example the free standing range would allow an 8 awg copper normally, yet a cooktop may often allow a 12 awg normally. The rule you are quoting is designed for tapping two appliances from that one 6 awg branch circuit conductor.

The whip that is only about 3' long was supplied by the manufacturer and is under the rules of an appliance and approved by UL not really under the NEC rules at all but under the rules of appliance design and a part of the appliance with the total design approved by a testing lab. The NEC is commonly not followed in this integrated equipment design.

I am not saying you are wrong in stating the 10 awg is allowed for use as that whip but I am trying to point out that whip is controlled under a different set of rules other than the NEC.

Now if it was a knockout in the back of the range and you installed a rubber cord you would size close to the same 10 awg by using the flexible cord and cables with a plug rules in Article 422.

Copied section of NEC 2002 and handbook commentary.

422.10 Branch-Circuit Rating.
This section specifies the ratings of branch circuits capable of carrying appliance current without overheating under the conditions specified.
Conductors that form integral parts of appliances are tested as part of the listing or labeling process.


Look at the last statement of 422.10 confirming what I am trying to point out.

Just trying to point out that 210.19.3 is allowing a smaller conductor to tap off that bigger branch circuit conductor to serve a smaller amp rated cooking appliance plus the bigger appliance as long as that branch circuit is rated for two appliances per 220.19 and the second appliance tap is not rated smaller than 20 amp. 210.19.3 is calling for the conductors to either of the two appliances to be sized equal to the amp rating of the appliance that either of those two taps serve individually yet the branch circuit must be sized to the combined load of both appliances.

The smaller conductor in that whip supplied by the manufacturer that came with the unit is controlled by listing and labeling set by a testing lab under a different set of rules as an integrated part of that appliance that is exempt from NEC rules.

Hope this helps

Wg
 

Last edited by Wgoodrich; 06-21-02 at 03:17 PM.
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