Garage outlets

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Old 06-27-02, 06:15 AM
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Zathrus
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Garage outlets

I had a new sprinkler system installed a few weeks ago with a nice electronic Hunter control system. It has a battery backup, but prefers to feed itself off the AC system. Of course, there was no electrical outlet near where I wanted it, but the contractor assured me it wouldn't be a problem.

Well I just figured out what he did... he plugged the transformer block into one of the existing outlets and then ran 18 gauge lamp cord around the perimeter of the garage to the controller. I hadn't realized this until last night since the transformer looks just like the transformer for my 3.6v cordless screwdriver... which was totally drained when I went to use it. Happy happy, joy joy.

What's the proper code (my city code is NEC 1996) for fixing this? Can I just run 12-2 romex along the ceiling to over near the controller and put in an outlet? Or do I need metal clad and a metal box? The garage is beneath the main floor of my house, uninsulated, no drywall on the walls in question, and stays dry 100% of the time. The run would be roughly 30' from an existing box (only 2 outlets on the circuit currently). I'm going to upgrade the entire circuit to 20 amp eventually, but have a lot of other projects to do first.
 
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Old 06-27-02, 06:25 AM
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You don't need to fix this. It's fine as is.
 
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Old 06-27-02, 06:49 AM
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I advise you to install a GFI receptacle as close as possible to the equiptment.You can use PVC as the Wiring Method.PVC is a non-metallic conduit and the "joints" are secured with a semi-liquid adhesive.Factory formed "bends" and condulets for making turns in the "run" are available. You will need three #12 conductors,1 Black and 1 White for the 110 volt supply and a Green Equiptment Grounding Conductor.You can use a metal outlet box for the GFI receptacle. The Greeen EGC must be "bonded" to the metal and terminated on the Green Grounding terminal of the GFI receptacle.Good Luck, and enjoy a sense of accomplishment when the project is complete.
 
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Old 07-09-02, 10:57 AM
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Zathrus
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After a long delay on replying...

Ok, while I realize now that I may not need to fix this, I want to -- partially because I'd like to have an outlet closer to the garage door for using electrical tools in the yard, and partially because my work bench needs more outlets as-is for power tools.

A single 20-amp breaker should be sufficient for 1 flourescent light, 2 outlets, and a powerbar strip with 5-6 outlets on it, correct?

I will be putting in a GFCI outlet as the first one on the chain.
 
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Old 07-09-02, 11:50 AM
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It doesn't matter how many outlets there are. It matters only what you plug into them. But a 20-amp circuit should be fine to handle the lighting and power tools for one person working at a workbench.
 
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