lights and recepticals on same circuit

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Old 06-28-02, 05:28 AM
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lights and recepticals on same circuit

It seems that I have read somewhere that it is not advisable to have the recepticals in a room and the ceiling light on the same circuit. I ran the lights in a house I am doing on their own circuit. I will have the recepticals in each room on their own circuit also. I don't like the idea of the lights dimming if something is plugged up or turned on. I guess this situation depends on the load on that circuit. But, I also don't like the idea of total darkness in the house if the light circuit trips. It seems i could have used a lot less wire by branching off the light in each room to the recepticals instead of the way I did it.
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Old 06-28-02, 06:23 AM
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You have already stated all of the argument that I have heard.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 06:30 AM
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The "total darkness" argument is oft cited, but that argument is completely unimportant to me -- it happens only once in a blue moon, and it doesn't cause much of a problem when it does -- just step out into the hall.

But the dimming lights really annoys people -- it makes them worry that something in wrong when in fact nothing is. So I separate them for this reason alone.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 07:37 AM
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I agree with John on the "total darkness" argument, I don't think it's really that big a deal. At least not in residential living areas. However, in workshops and garages, I think it is a real good idea to separate the receptacles and lights. If your power tools are plugged into the same circuit as the lights and you trip a breaker, you could be in the dark with a coasting blade.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 12:43 PM
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I've been in the dark with a coasting blade before (almost always due to a power outage rather than a tripped breaker). First thing is to not move a muscle until it is dead quiet. And then get that wood out of the blade before the power comes back on.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 06:53 PM
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I think I have to agree with all the above. I am glad I ran them seperate. Always got a lamp somewhere close.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 07:39 PM
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I agree with John Nelson, most equiptment for light duty work is wired direct or with a 2 wire control circuit. This is very dangerous becase in the event of a power outage, the machine goes back to the condition it was in before power out, if it was on it will still be on. Bad, Bad very Bad.
The industrial sector of this country figured this out years ago, and most machines have a 3 wire control circuit or a holding contact, if the machine is on and power goes out the holding relay opens up and when power is restored the machine is off. You have to manually turn it back on, when you know your hands are clear and everyone elses too.

Just something to think about.
cheers
 
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