Electrical

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Old 06-28-02, 09:43 AM
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phoobear2
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Electrical

I have a 220 line in the basement right below an out let in my dinning room.How can I take that and run it to the outlet so I can use that outlet for my a/c. There is also a vent there.My problem is I have an a/c that needs a 220 line but the line for the outlet I want to use is a 110 line. what can I do.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 10:08 AM
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Begin by telling us more about that 220 line in the basement. What does this line serve now?
 
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Old 06-28-02, 11:12 AM
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phoobear2
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The only thing the 220 line is used for an electric dryer & is not to any use to me .
 
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Old 06-28-02, 12:00 PM
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Okay. That will get the voltage right. Now let's worry about the amperage. How many amps is the A/C, and what's the number written on the dryer's breaker? We can make this work -- we just need to identify what's involved. Is the wire copper or aluminum? Do you have a breaker box or a fuse panel?
 
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Old 06-28-02, 12:42 PM
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phoobear2
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The a/c is a 17.5 BTU,I think it is copper,I have a breaker box & the # for the dryer is on 14 & 16
 
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Old 06-28-02, 12:46 PM
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Sorry, I wasn't clear. When I asked about the number on the dryer's breaker, I was referring to the number on the trip lever on the breaker itself, not the number on the panel next to the breaker. I'm trying to find out how many amps the breaker is. Most modern dryers are on 30-amp breakers, but some older ones were on 20-amp breakers.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 01:10 PM
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phoobear2
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I'm sorry I missunderstud what you meant.Well seeings how the breaker was just redone I would assume that it is on 30. I don't know much when it comes to this kind of things.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 02:05 PM
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phoobear2
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I did check it & it is on a 30amp. If you can help it would be great.Thanks for your time.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 05:15 PM
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Somewhere on the A/C itself or on its paperwork, you will find instructions on what size breaker it should be installed on (I'm guessing 240-volt double-pole 15 amps). You should change the breaker in the panel to match those requirements (assuming it is not above 30 amps, which it almost certainly isn't).

If you have trouble figuring this out, tell us in detail what the plug looks like. You can compare it to the receptacles displayed here.

Then remove the dryer receptacle, and use the box as a permanently-accessible and covered junction box. Make the connections to a new cable sized to match the breaker you just installed (14/2 or better for 15 amps, or 12/2 or better for 20 amps). Then drill a hole up through the subfloor and sole plate into the wall cavity where you want the new receptacle. Cut a hole in the finish material of the wall and install an old work box. Then install a receptacle of the appropriate type for the voltage and amperage of the A/C and you're all set.

If you have any doubts as to your skill to do all of the above safely, then seek help.
 
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Old 06-28-02, 07:17 PM
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phoobear2
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Thank You For All Of Your Help. I'm glad that I found this web sight.
 
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