electrical system help for a novice

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  #1  
Old 07-08-02, 08:54 AM
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mafreemn2000
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electrical system help for a novice

Just moved into an older apartment building with an older electrical system. Manager said my window A/C unit could not be more than 7.5 amps. Paid alot of money for a 10,000 BTU, 7.5 amp A/C unit which I cannot return. The unit blows fuses. Any suggestions as tol how I could get this A/C unit to work? Do I have to unplug other appliances or just leave them turned off? COuld some other tenant be using my power? Thanks for your help
 
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  #2  
Old 07-08-02, 11:37 AM
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Wirenut33
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A couple questions. Do you have actual fuses, or do you have breakers? Do you have a seperate panel for your apartment? If you have fuses, replace the one that blows with the A/C unit with a time delay fuse, but DO NOT exceed the rating of the current fuse. Short of getting your landlord to have a dedicated circuit installed for the A/C unit, your only other option may be to use a window fan with a simultaneous intake and exhaust. Where did you buy the unit? I find it hard to believe that you are unable to take it back for a smaller unit, say maybe a 5,000, 6,000, or 8,000 BTU unit, which would not trip the breaker or blow a fuse, whichever is applicable in your case.
 
  #3  
Old 07-08-02, 05:12 PM
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Wgoodrich
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Wirenut33 had some good points that may help. While reading his posts I thought of a couple of no no' s that you may not be aware of that also may help.

A 7.5 amp a/c unit should work fine on a 15 amp breaker as long as you don't have anything else on that branch circuit. Turn off that breaker that trips with the a/c and see if you have anything else on that branch circuit that goes dead. A toaster, microwave, coffee pot etc. would overload that 15 amp breaker if ran at the same time as the a/c unit. If this is your problem you may be able to move your a/c unit to a lightly loaded branch circuit to solve the problem or move the other loads on that original branch circuit to a different branch circuit.

The second thought I had was a history of a/c motors tripping breakers when you turn off the a/c unit the turn that a/c unit back on before around a 5 minute wait for the a/c unit to clear for restart. This may be what is happening also.

Let us know what you find.

Wg
 
  #4  
Old 07-09-02, 08:46 AM
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mafreemn2000
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thanks for the help, the advice was good. The apartment has 2 15 amp circuits with one dedicated to the fridge only. So the rest of the apartment must run on a single 15 amp circuit. So I went to the store, bought a bunch of fuses, and blew them up to find out what I could run. Turns out the microwave eats way too much juice, even when its just pluged in. If I unplug the micro, everything single other thing will run with the AC on full blast. So, my only other dilema is what if someone else is somehow running appliances in another apartment on my circuit, just not at the moment so I think everything is OK, but its not. Thanks again for your help
 
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