romex in conduit?

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  #1  
Old 07-08-02, 05:24 PM
gbear
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romex in conduit?

I've been remodeling the garage/shop and now I'm faced with running new electrical. The original electrical was not in-wall but surface mounted. I've kept to the original idea but I'm now being told I can't run "Romex" through the conduit I've purchased. So, do I run individual wires? Why no Romex? Also, I assume 12-2 wire is fine for the 20-amp circuits?

Thanks for any information.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-08-02, 05:33 PM
Wgoodrich
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John Nelson once started a post concerning exactly the subject you are asking about. It should go a long way toward helping to answer your quest. I asked John way back when he originally wrote the post if he minded that I convert it to an article and post it on our web site. He agreed. I made sure that he retained the credit for his writings and have used that article that he wrote several times. Hope it helps you to understand not only that you can install Romex [nonmetallic sheathed cable] in a conduit but he also explains how to calculate the conduit fill. Try reading what he wrote then come back in if you have more questions.

http://www.homewiringandmore.com/hom...lenmb2emt.html

Thanks John, this is why I wanted to save and post your writings on this subject. You did good.

Wg
 
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Old 07-08-02, 05:46 PM
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I'm now being told
I hate those words. If your neighbor or a coworker told you this, then you should completely ignore it. However, if your inspector told you this, then you must do what he/she says. There seem to be a lot of local variations on what inspectors require when it comes to wiring an unfinished garage.
 
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Old 07-09-02, 07:51 AM
gbear
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Thanks to Wgoodrich for the pointer and John Nelson for the article. I'll head to the library this afternoon and look up the specifics on my situation. One thing though: is it a HEAT issue that allows the conduit to be filled only partially? I'm assuming the conduit doesn't release heat fast enough if there are too many conductors.

Thanks again for the help.
 
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Old 07-09-02, 08:20 AM
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My understanding is that conduit fill is not primarily a heat issue, but rather a concern for the wires being damaged as they are pulled through the conduit. The heat issue is handled by other codes on ampacity derating.
 
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Old 07-09-02, 05:14 PM
Wgoodrich
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It is my understanding that John is right. When you contain the conductors within a cable you are taking up much more room than if they were single conductors without an outer sheath. The bigger cable sheath is why they have the special conduit fill calculations becuase those cables with a nonmetallic sheath fill up that conduit much faster. I too understand it as John was saying.

Wg
 
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