2 fuses 1 dryer

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  #1  
Old 07-09-02, 05:42 PM
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2 fuses 1 dryer

Why would I have 2 fuses to one dryer? They are of two different styles, yet both 30a. These are the only two fuses in this particular box, and aren't labeled. If I remove the one on the right, the dryer still turns, yet the element doesn't heat up. If I remove the one on the left, nothing happens with the dryer at all. Put both in, and you're set to go.

In my rental house, I had one fuse that dealt with the dryer. If it blew while the dryer was going, it would still allow the tub to turn, however, no heat. When you turned it to the off position or opened the door, you would not be able to turn it back on until you replaced the fuse.

Right now, the dryer is turning yet there is no heat, and I just replaced both fuses. Also, on the right fuse holder, it is a burnt color of black in there and the contact is not its usual bright coppery self (screw or whatever).

I'm not real secure working around these boxes, especially when I don't know why its wired the way it is.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Kay
 
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Old 07-09-02, 07:41 PM
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Wgoodrich
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Electric dryers use 220 volts for the heat but only 120 volts for the motor to run. 220 volts require both fuses to be in for the heat to work in the dryer bacause your heat element is 220 volt rated.

The motor will run on only one fuse using one of hte same fuses that the heating element uses at the same time.

The reason some dryers will run if the second fuse is removed while it is running yet the starting controls in the console uses the second fuse to start the motor. If that second fuse is out then the motor won't restart because the control is without power. If it is running the the contact is closed which would back feed power as long as the motor is running but lose contact when the motor stops.

You most likely have one of four possible problems as follows in order of most likely to least likely in my opinion;

The fuse that has burn marks may not be making contact. YOu can remove your panel cover and use a voltage tester touch one prong to the screw coming from the fuse and the second prong touch the bar on the side of the panel where all the white wires are connected. If the pocking burn marks are causing you the problem the tester will not show power on that fuse screw.

second possibility could be that your heat element of the dryer is burnt out. Unplug your dryer. Take the back of the dryer off and look for a long silver tube that the heat element is in. YOu will find two big wires connected to the bottom of the heat element where it comes out of that silver tube. Use a continuity tester to test between these two connections with the wires disconnected. If you show a connection through that heat element chances are your heat element is good. If you don't then your heat element is burnt out.

Third possibility is a thermodisc has failed. You may have only two thermo discs or maybe three or four thermo disc depending on the heat temp control design of your dryer. Just unplug each thermo disc and use your continuity tester to confirm the thermo disc is connected and good.

Fourth possibility is the timer may be bad losing power to the heat element through that dryer timer control.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
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Old 07-09-02, 08:31 PM
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thanks wg, i will start at the top of list and work my way down. the dryer has been blowing one of the fuses on a regular basis (monthly-kind of like a bill ) lately, so i may have other problems.

i'll post back and let you know what i find out.

kay
 
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Old 07-09-02, 09:06 PM
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Wgoodrich
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The fuse that is blowing is a good chance that is your problem. A dryer with electric heat tends to make the connections loosen due to the heating and cooling of those connections during intermittent use. Once the fuse becomes loose then burn marks appear on both the fuse and the center screw that the fuse makes contact with. Once that center screw has been heated enough then you can't make a contact with that center screw to send power through that fuse keeping your dryer from heating.

I would move that wire connected to that fuse in question to the next fuse beside that fuse. Make a trade with the two wires one not being the dryer and the other being the dryer. Then install new fuses 30 amp for the dryer and an amp rating matching the fuse that used to be on the other wire you moved.

This should tell you if pocking burn marks has been your problem and move a more lightly loaded circuit onto that weakened fuse.

Hope this helps

Wg
 
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Old 07-10-02, 12:21 AM
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okay, that sounds simple enough. we have 2 fuse boxes next to each other. the dryer is the only thing in the 6 fuse box, next to it is the main fuse box. if i pull the main fuses in the second (main box) then it will cut the power to the second box next to it as well, correct? of course, a tester will be used to verify this.

second, how do i get into the box? I have 4 screws which appear to hold the "face" of the box. when i remove those and the cover, i will have access to the wires...correct?

I've only had experience with breaker boxes, not the fuse kind. i am hoping they are they same principal, just one with fuses and the other with breaker switches.

this house scares me since it is wired very different from any house i've lived in. i also have another breaker box outside, but the power company explained that one to me: it contains the breaker switches for my shop and the yard light. i didn't have the forsight to ask them if the main fuse box is connected inline with it or not. no matter, since i won't be messing with it.

i hate to be a bother, however, i do enjoy being alive and would like to keep myself that way as long as possible.

thank you for your help.

kay
 
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Old 07-10-02, 03:24 PM
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Wgoodrich
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YOu stated earlier that you had a rental house. I assumed that you owned a rental house. Now I am picking up that you are the renter. This project should be done by the owner of the house. If you do it you invite liability that you should not be accepting.

Am I reading this situation correctly?

Wg
 
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Old 07-10-02, 06:54 PM
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we bought this house, but when i rented i did work with the owner of the property.

i was just noting that this is different than the houses and apartments that i've rented before. i always watched to learn when the maintenance crew would come out to fix anything since i knew that one day i would be a homeowner and need to learn to fix as much myself as possible. and to also be aware of what to watch for when it was necessary for me to hire someone to do the work...a better educated consumer, for example.

i did change the wires as you said and everything is up and running. thank you so much for your help, and i apologize for the confusion.

kay
 
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