GFI question


  #1  
Old 07-17-02, 04:23 PM
J
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GFI question

Is it correct to say that if you install a GFI plug in a box without a pre-existing ground wire, this will take care of your grounding problems?? Also, will it protect the outlets that are furthur down the chain from the same gfi?? Any special instructions on hooking them up, or is it just like a standard duplex? I know that these outlets are used primarily for damp areas, but can it be a quick fix for no grounding in a plastic box???
 
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Old 07-17-02, 04:47 PM
J
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No, not quite.

A GFCI provides no grounding, but it does provide protection against shocks caused by improper current to ground (e.g., through you). And when installed properly, it does provide protection for other outlets downstream, providing there are other outlets downstream (may or may not be, depending on how your house is wired). You must hook them up according to directions, and they come with directions with a lot of tiny print. The key is to make sure that "line" and "load" connections are correct as indicated in the instructions. GFCIs are required in damp areas, but they are indeed an excellent choice in many dry areas too. They significantly enhance the safety of you and your family, especially in homes without equipment grounding conductors.

But GFCI provides no protection at all for sensitive electronic equipment, or other appliances that may work better with grounding. In short, a GFCI does not provide grounding.
 
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Old 07-17-02, 04:51 PM
J
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thanks, I think that answers my question!!!
 
  #4  
Old 07-17-02, 09:23 PM
Wgoodrich
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Jasontv8, older homes often were not wired daisy chain but octopus method instead. To make sure you GFI is protecting the other receptacles you wish it to protect take out the receptacle where you plan on installing your GFI and turn on the power. If you other receptacles are still with power then that receptacle you want ot replace will not protect those other receptacles. Often times in older homes there is no first receptacle due to the ocopussing out of a light fixture. IN this case you will need to install a GFI breaker in the panel to serve that branch circuit or install a GFI receptacle below the panel and run the power through that GFI receptacle from the breaker of fuse and then the load side of that GFI would be connected to the wire feeding that existing branch circuit and its receptacles.

HOpe this helps

Wg
 
 

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