Equiptment ground

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  #1  
Old 07-21-02, 01:32 PM
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J A Boggan
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Question Equiptment ground

Is the middle prong on a range plug always connected to ground?
 
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  #2  
Old 07-21-02, 02:56 PM
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Yup
 
  #3  
Old 07-21-02, 03:36 PM
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Yes, assuming you're talking about a 3-prong range plug connected to a 3-hole range receptacle. And if that assumption is true, then the middle prong is the neutral too. We might be able to help more if you explain why you're asking.
 
  #4  
Old 07-21-02, 06:55 PM
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J A Boggan
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This range plug I wired is with (6-2/with bare ground). I was just considering, maybe I should use 6-3. Because the ground conductor looks to be a #10. Or, is this acceptable. It is fed from a subpanel were the neutral and mechanical ground are seperate.

Thanks for your advice.
 
  #5  
Old 07-22-02, 03:16 AM
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That should be acceptable. If you are uncomfortable with it then going to 6/3 will certainly pose no problem. I myself never cared for the derated bare copper ground wire on cords either. But it is safe.
 
  #6  
Old 07-22-02, 03:40 AM
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J A Boggan
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Thumbs up

Thanks, I really appreciate your comments.

Great forum.
 
  #7  
Old 07-22-02, 03:46 AM
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Glad to help!
 
  #8  
Old 07-22-02, 02:39 PM
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Wgoodrich
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Boggan, NOPE!

You are not allowed to run the cable that you have mentioned 6/2wGrnd with a reduced bare wire in it I think.

If you have a cable that is black, white, and bare then you're wiring was and is not meeting the requirements of the NEC.

A new range or dryer branch circuit must be wired with a four wire cable containing a black, red, white and bare.

An existing branch circuit in order to be accepted as an existing dryer or range branch circuit must contain an insulated black, and insulated red, and an insulated white wire in your existing cable. You do have a cable that is a service entrance cable that has an insulated black an insulated red, and a bare grounding conductor but that bare grounding conductor must be the same size as the other two conductors and must wrap around the two hot conductors the full length of that cable. The SE cable does not have a white conductor in it.

Any cable that has a black and white conductor and a bare conductor that is smaller than the black and white conductors is a nonmetallic sheathed cable and must not be used unless that cable contains a red conductor also.

Sorry

Wg
 
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