power actuated fastener

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  #1  
Old 12-02-02, 06:41 AM
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Question power actuated fastener

I plan on purchasing a .22 cal fastener. They don't appear to flush nail (at least not in the store dislay) I need to attach sheetrock over the nails. Can I tap on the face of the sheetrockwith to force it flush?
Thanks in advance.
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 12-10-02 at 10:06 AM.
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  #2  
Old 12-02-02, 07:28 AM
RickJ6956
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I just finished attaching PT 2x4 bottom plates to my basement floor with a Remington PAF. All but one went in completely flush, but some of the plastic guides stick out a bit. I cut them off with a utility knife.

The one that didn't go all the way in was my fault -- I didn't hold the tool exactly perpendicular to the floor when I whacked it. Also, make sure you compress the PAF's spring all the way before you hit the device.

If you tap on the wallboard, it will crack around the nail. Instead, put the drywall in place and push on it slightly so it leaves marks on the backside where the nails are making contact. Then notch out the backside where the nails are so the drywall sits flush on the studs.
 
  #3  
Old 12-02-02, 09:58 AM
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I have the type that you hit with a hammer and it works fairly well using it on the floor. But using it on a wall, I have a terrible time. I seem to have trouble hitting it perfectly square and hard enough; probably don't use it enough.

Has anyone had any experience with the type that uses a trigger? I've been thinking about putting one on my Christmas list.

Bruce
 
  #4  
Old 12-04-02, 08:00 AM
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I have had the hammer actuated Remington for about 25 years and it has worked well for me, but it takes quite a hammer blow to set it off. I have also used the trigger fired ones and they are so much easier to use. If mine ever goes belly-up, the replacement will be the type you **** by opening and fire with the trigger.

Concerning the original question, the depth that the spike goes to is based on a combination of
1. the power of the charge used (several choices available)
2. the thickness and hardness of the wood being nailed
3. the density and age of the concrete being fired into

I've had some spikes blast completely through the lumber, while sometimes the spike stands proud. It is tough to get a consistent depth due to the lack of uniformity in wood and concrete density.
 
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