are rechargeable drill batteries replaceable?

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  #1  
Old 12-05-02, 11:45 AM
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are rechargeable drill batteries replaceable?

Hi all,
First of all, thanks very much for the clarification on the left-handed chuck screw and the right-handed threading of the chuck onto the spindle. I was able to get the chuck off with no difficulty. (See about 8 threads back, title of thread = "how to remove drill chuck")

Now, some more questions:
The reason I had to remove the chuck was that the battery pack in my cordless drill/driver had died, and I had ordered a new pack from Sears and was replacing it. I had to remove the chuck in order to disassemble the plastic drill body. Well, to make a long story short, I never did succeed in installing the new battery pack because the electrical connectors were different from those on the old battery pack. My question:
Is or isn't the battery pack in a rechargeable drill meant to be replaceable by the user? I note that in my Sears manual there are instructions for disassembling the drill to remove the old batteries for proper disposal (nickel-cadmium) but *no* instructions for reassembling the drill. Also, it turns out that the cost of the replacement battery pack was almost as much as the cost of a new drill!

Another question:
Why is the screw that locks the chuck onto the spindle reverse threaded?

regards,
Joe
 
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  #2  
Old 12-05-02, 05:10 PM
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kfJoey:

Hopefully you can return the battery.

The batteries in these drills are seldom replaced.
As you found out they are meant to be disposable.

I'm not sure why it's reverse. When I sit here and spin my pen cw that would make the screw tighten in the normal direction???
 
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Old 12-05-02, 07:34 PM
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Hi Greg,
Thanks for the reply.

>>Hopefully you can return the battery.
Yes, I've already checked and Sears is cooperating.
Seems like a dumb idea to have to discard the whole drill when the batteries go. What if they did that with cameras or desktop computers? At the very least it would have been nice if the Craftsman manual pointed out that the batteries were not user-replaceable.

>>I'm not sure why it's reverse.
>>When I sit here and spin my pen cw that would
>>make the screw tighten in the normal direction???
Exactly (!?)

Thanks again,
Joep
 
  #4  
Old 12-05-02, 07:48 PM
NutAndBoltKing
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Smile It's principal of "Dynamic Friction"

In answer to the question about the screw: Dynamic friction is resistance to relative movement of bodies in motion. Since the chuck spins in one directional motion more often than it does in the other directional motion the fastener needs to be applied in the lesser directional motion so that it will experience a frictional embedment and stay tight. Another example of the dynamic friction principal application are the old Chrysler Corporation cars of the 50s. The passenger side wheels of my DeSoto had left handed or counter-clockwise threads. The car moved forward much more than it did backwards so the theory is the left handed treads would not loosen as a typical right handed thread would.
 
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Old 12-05-02, 08:00 PM
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Ya, thats what I meant!
 
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Old 12-05-02, 08:12 PM
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Also: So that a dynamic frictional emedment is constant, some fasteners for chucks will be applied in what appears to be a similar direction to the more constant directional motion BUT it's actually being applied in the opposite direction to that which will cause breakloose torque. Really.
 
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Old 12-05-02, 08:16 PM
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Ya, I meant that too!
 
  #8  
Old 12-06-02, 07:11 AM
RickJ6956
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N&BKing,
Your post brought back memories of my first job at a gas station. A simple tire repair turned into a major expense for me when I used the impact wrench to break off all of the wheel's lugs on a then-new Chrysler New Yorker.

I also creased and punctured the bottom of the car's radiator with the hydraulic lift, but that's another story.

(Geez ... it's amazing that I didn't get fired over that fiasco. Both the car owner and my boss were very understanding of a 16-year-old kid trying to help out while the boss was at lunch. Nowadays, I'd probably get fired AND sued by both!)
 
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Old 12-06-02, 07:01 PM
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Rick,

>>Nowadays, I'd probably get fired AND sued by both!<<

Nope, that's not how it works (much too logical). Nowadays, the car owner would sue Chrysler (deep pockets). Alternatively, you could sue the state of New York and possibly your parents as well for allowing you to experience severe mental stress and subsequent negative developmental repercussions. Hell, this is 2002: why not sue the federal government as well?

Joe
 
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