cheaper chinese made air compressor

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  #1  
Old 12-19-02, 06:38 AM
Snapper6356
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cheaper chinese made air compressor

I have been looking for a smaller portable compressor but couldn't afford one.
Well i saw a no name side stack one for 90$$. It was direct drive with an oil lubed pump. Had like a 30 day warranty. Any body ever got one of these? Seems for the price I couldn't lose much. It wouldn't see much use.. So any thoughts welcome..
 
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  #2  
Old 12-19-02, 07:59 AM
kliot
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If you are not making a living using a compressor and just want one for occasional diy projects you may be very happy with one of these no-name models. Be sure and look the "CFM @ pressure" rating when choosing a compressor

You should check out www.harborfreight.com they have a number of copressors in the $90.00 range, they offer free shipping and have a great return policy.

I hope this helps
 
  #3  
Old 12-19-02, 01:49 PM
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Question Hey! What's up?

Snapper6356:

While thinking about the post you just made where you said:

"I have the campbell hausfeld extreme duty 30 gallon air compressor. I was wondering how it compared to the new ingersoll-Rand Garage Mate? They seem real similiar in size and output. Mine isn't 100% duty cycle, Seems mine is arond a 40 or so percent duty cycle which is plenty for me. I don't regret getting this one, just want your comments.. So what are your thoughts??"

I come upon this question.


What's up eh?
 
  #4  
Old 12-19-02, 03:02 PM
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Exclamation Snapper6356:

I hope your not trying to spam us with these questions about compressors.

If you are, at least you could space them out so it isn't so obvious.

Still, good questions though!

If your really interested in compressors, there is a ton of info here on q's that have been asked before. Just do a search.
 
  #5  
Old 12-20-02, 06:00 AM
RickJ6956
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Mmmm ... Harbor Freight! That catalog is a must-read in the bathroom!
 
  #6  
Old 12-20-02, 08:01 AM
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Hmmmmm, Harbor Freight.
Must reading - Not exactly. We use it instead of Charmin.
I don't buy there! I simply like QUALITY.
fred
 
  #7  
Old 12-20-02, 12:03 PM
Joe_F
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"America, Love it or Leave It".

Buy American, you will be glad you did. Spend the money on a quality one.

Save your 90 bucks and buy some good American made tools. Then, save up for a good air compressor from IR, Sears, CH, or one of the reliable US companies.

I bought my Craftsman for next to nothing from a neighbor. Deals are out there, just gotta find them.
 
  #8  
Old 12-21-02, 09:12 AM
RickJ6956
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I didn't say I bought anything from HF ... just that it's good bathroom reading. Besides, I find that the catalog's staples tend to irritate my butt.

(Actually, I did buy one of the specials: 115 drill bits for $29.95. So far, I have broken or bent every one I've used. Pure junk. But it came with a nice index and case that I'll have for a long time as I replace the cheepos with real bits over the next few years.)
 
  #9  
Old 12-23-02, 01:50 PM
Mr. Kiss
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Got my first experience with Chinese made tools about a hundred years ago while remodelling a basement. I needed a 1/4" bit and the houses owner mentioned he had a new set so I borrowed his. Alarms started going off almost immediately when he handed me the cheap index and I noticed where they were made. That little voice told me to walk outside and get mine out of the van but we were trying to finish so he could throw a scheduled party.
Anyway, I was drilling a mounting hole in a 1900 electrical box and hadn't been drilling long when the bit bent and traveled into one side of my index finger and out the other. Needless to say the Peoples Republic of China lost a valuable customer that day.

If you plan to buy their crap why not just take your hard earned cash and burn it in the same dump where I'm sure the remnants (what I didn't mash with an AMERICAN made hammer)of that drill index may still be found.

Hope I made my point.
Larry
 
  #10  
Old 12-24-02, 09:16 PM
bit_twiddler
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Wow lg!

One bad experience with a chinese drill bit, and now all chinese products must be bad? I'm sure nobody out there has ever gotten hurt using an American product. You know the rule: You get what you pay for. I buy Vermont American drill bits from Wal-Mart. I don't pay much, and they don't last forever.
 
  #11  
Old 12-25-02, 07:20 AM
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Here's a good rule of thumb to remember.

There are some good tools (many major brands) and products made in Formosa (Taiwan) because quality control has been in place for a number of years.

Products made on mainland China have not seen the same control methods. So it sort of depends where the product was actually made.

fred
 
  #12  
Old 12-25-02, 07:58 AM
Joe_F
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Here's another thing to remember:

When you buy American products, you give your neighbors a job, from the gal/guy that makes them, to the person that packs them, to the person that ships them to the handlers at the plant, to the service people that fix them, as well as the vendors that supply parts for them.

The ripple effect is tremendous. That is why I do my best to only buy U.S. or Canadian made tools.


I'll say it again: Love it or leave it.
 
  #13  
Old 12-25-02, 08:37 AM
Mr. Kiss
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I don't expect tools to last forever but drill bits are NEVER supposed to bend unless they are designed to do so. You won't see many craftsmen buying Made In China. Personally, I've been to China and you can keep the whole country. Tiawan is another story and I have no problem buying from them.

Years ago I worked for SK tools in Chicago, pretty good stuff back then and probably still the "Chevy" of hand tools.

I buy USA when I can but it gets more difficult every day. I worked for American Mfg companies and the last one made me rethink how I look at purchases. Just because it's made in USA does not necessarily guarantee quality.

At the same time, I have a friend who owns a vertical milling machine made in China. Pretty good machine..... only thing is is it's an exact duplicate of a Brown & Sharp model designed and mfg here in the states many years ago.
 
  #14  
Old 12-25-02, 11:48 AM
Joe_F
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LG:

What did you buy that was bad? I've never had a problem with anything US made I own. It has been far superior to anything from overseas.

I own six American cars, all American appliances, toolboxes, tools, etc . No problems with any of them in comparison to stuff made offshore.

S-K stuff is pretty good. They do not have the name like Snap On or MAC (which is owned by Stanley now), or Matco (owned by Danaher---same company that makes Craftsman stuff).

I'll take the "Chevy" of anything over the "Hyundai"-best of overseas .

Made in America means it's good. Always has, always will mean that.
 
  #15  
Old 12-25-02, 12:06 PM
Mr. Kiss
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Joe,
I wasn't saying it was something I bought I was saying it was something we MADE. I was a Field Service Engineer for an un-mentioned US company and their attitude was "get it out the door" and let Field Service worry about it. I could be on the other side of the planet fighting against the odds to get a new piece of equipment to run that they couldn't make work in the shop! I wasn't real good at BSing the customer about our product which is why I'm not working there anymore. We had "Engineers" by title only and I saw some equipment designs my kids could have improved upon. Perhaps I was spoiled from working with real engineers and crafts in R&D labs for 15 years prior to that job but I'm betting it's the rule rather than the exception.
 
  #16  
Old 12-25-02, 01:05 PM
Joe_F
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LG:

There are bad apples in all industries as you know. However, this country is not #1 for just anything .

We have the best tools, talent, people, machines, material and know-how in the world. Everyone seeks to come here for mostly anything, as we do it best.

Call me ethnocentric, but we aren't #1 by chance .
 
  #17  
Old 12-25-02, 01:52 PM
Mr. Kiss
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Well Joe I dunno....
I've been around the world more times than I want to count and a good portion of that time was in manufacturing plants where we were installing our equipment onto another mfg equipment to be shipped to the buyer. From my experience during that time it ocurred to me that the only ones who considered us to be #1 was us. Now don't get me wrong about my commitment and allegiance to my homeland but there's plenty of instances where we simply don't compete. If it were true that we're number 1 in all those instances foreign mfg goods wouldn't stand a chance here. I'm old enough to know why Japanese cars (and everything else) became so popular here in the 70's and it was because of the attitude we're better than everyone else and then ship an inferior product. It doesn't take long before people get tired of being bent over and told how much we enjoy it.

It doesn't take long to loose a customer and may take a lifetime to win him back. When the Nips started importing their cars in the 70's many good ol boys laughed em right outta town but they hung in there and now own a sizable portion of the market. So, tell me, is it because they build cheaper cars and the cost of material and labor is less?
When we had a need for smaller more fuel efficient cars what did the "Big Three" bring to market? Does Vega sound familiar?
Back in the 80's I worked in one of the large refinary co's R&D labs and ate lunch with the boys from the formulation and life testing area. Take a guess what kind of cars every last one of them drove? (Hint: Not one was designed and built in the US) Does Quad 4 ring any bells?

Thank God we learned some valuable lessons over the last 30 years but there's still a lot of room for improvement. People demand quality and reliability for their cash and deservedly so regardless of where it's made.
 
  #18  
Old 12-25-02, 03:04 PM
Joe_F
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You make some good points....but some need clarification.

The only cars that the Japanese built in the 70's were small econoboxes. They were only good for that. After a few years, they rotted, had electrical failures and turned to dust. Not to mention the prices of the parts went up. Compared to a U.S. small car at the time, they were just more efficient, not necessarily any better. Most small cars are bargain basement---not much thought went into them.

The Japanese can't build a full-size car to save their life, they still can't. I'd put the ride of my 84 Oldsmobile 88 against my neighbor's 2002 Acura. My Oldsmobile drives better, quieter and is roomier . My neighbor's Acura can't sit 6 people, tow 5000 pounds or have a large enough trunk to fit what I have fit in my trunk .

As for "us" thinking we're better, you might ask yourself why all of the immigrants come HERE for a better life. My very good friend is Korean, and his mother and father escaped the Communists in Korea, so they are very hard working folks (his dad was a dedicated and diligent pharmacist in a hospital, he's passed on now). They love this country and haven't lost their Korean heritage. Only here could they have acheived such a life.

Kids from foreign countries come HERE for an education.

Quad 4 is a GM designed and built engine .

As for improvements, continuous improvement is part of ANY company's regimen. If it weren't, they would be out of business.

Look at Cadillac. They were not that great in the 80's and have come a LONG way to being a contender again in the luxury segment.

I've yet to buy one American made product where I could say, "Yea, the Taiwanese or Japanese or German or whatever one was better".
 
  #19  
Old 12-26-02, 06:03 AM
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You can't tell by the brand name as to the country of origin anymore. I was in the 'Big Box' the other afternoon and decided to buy a few replacement drill bits as several I have are worn out. I looked at a set by Skill and saw they were from China. I finally setteled on some Black & Decker which were from the Homeland.
 
  #20  
Old 12-26-02, 09:45 AM
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In our new and improved world of consumerism we need to learn to read the fine print carefully. Marketers count on the fact that the vast majority of us don't take the time to read the labels and packaging before we buy or open and use a product. This goes for everything especially food. Take note of a large percentage of food products and their labeling. How much of it does the average American understand about the ingredients or average daily requirements? Also take note that the majority of food is sold by weight not by volume... Now consider the fact that salt and refined sugar are cheap and heavy.... ever wonder why they use so much? Last week the wife brought home a Hormel product labeled especially for children. It contained 890 mg of sodium!
Why in Gods name would I want to serve that amount to my kids in a single serving when that's probably more than I would want to consume in a day? Considering that children have a very limited sense of taste for what reason can they give to add that amount to their food especially since a salt shaker is widely available on most American tables (not in my home)?

In case you haven't noticed...
I'M MAD AS HELL AND I'M NOT GOING TO TAKE IT ANY LONGER!
 
  #21  
Old 12-26-02, 11:04 PM
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I do agree that "MADE IN U.S.A." gives me the feeling of a quality product much more than "made in china or taiwan". China being the worst. Taiwan used to be terrible, and is still far below par, but at least it is getting better. Some things from there actually surprise me and turn out to be fairly decent. But not tools. Being someone who has busted enough knuckles and rounded off enough bolt heads with inferior tools, I know which ones to avoid, and which ones will do fine. Any tool (except maybe a hammer) from asia is thrown in the trash. Chinese products are almost never a "new" product anyway. They are usually a poor quality copy of something someone else made.

I will say that Germany has some really good engineers, and I will not hesitate to use a tool made there. Their steel is usually better than ours. I got some german drill bits for Christmas and will put them to the test soon. I trust any german made product, but would rather support our own any day. We need to be self -supportive...making ourselves stronger, not weaker and dependent on other countries.

The definition of a third world country : A country that exports raw materials, and imports finished products. Isn't that what we are doing more and more of? Maybe because enough of us don't look at the tiny words on the back of the box. If they don't say "made in the USA", and we buy anyway...we are supporting someone else, and contributing to our problem.

Hmmm...I guess I'm rambling...off topic at that...so I'll shut up now, lol! .
 
  #22  
Old 12-27-02, 07:25 AM
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Try to find a TV, VCR, stereo, DVD player or any other consumer electronic entertainment device that's made in the USA. For all intents and purposes, that entire industry in this country is dead.

I've worked in video production for twenty years. When I started, Ampex, RCA, and a number of other American companies were brand names that were seen regularly in the control rooms. Today, there is only one name seen almost exclusively: Sony.

If there are other names in the studios, they are Panasonic, JVC, Hitachi & Ikegami (Japan), Leitch (Canada), or RCA/Thompson Broadcast (Europe). Ampex, once the powerhouse for tape-based video and audio recording, was the last American manufacturer to cease production.

Most of the foreign car manufacturers have plants in the US or use US-made parts & engines, so the old prejudices against "rice burners" no longer hold water. But the profits leave our soil and return in the form of investments in domestic real estate.

To me, the biggest culprit is Wal-Mart. Although they claim to be proud of the "Made in America" label, I have yet to find anything in that store that doesn't say it's made in Taiwan or China.

I read somewhere that the number one export out of the port of NY is scrap steel. Number two is paper. Both are sent to other continents to be remade into new products, which are then shipped back to the USA's consumers.

"I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore!" is a quote from the movie, Network.

A quote to summarize my post might be, "Soon they'll be breeding us like cattle! You've got to warn everyone and tell them! Soylent green is made of people! You've got to tell them! Soylent green is people!"
 
  #23  
Old 12-27-02, 01:54 PM
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Guys,
I'm all for buying American made products myself, but face it, many, many items are manufactured overseas.
If you read the Wood Magazine articles on tool reviews you'll learn to adjust to many of the good products which are made elsewhere. For example, Nov 2002 issue reviews random orbit sanders - B&D-China, Bosch-Switzerland or USA, Craftsman-China, DeWalt-Mexico, Makita-USA, Milwaukee-Taiwan, PC-USA, and Ryobi-China. These origin countries and manufacturers are interchangeable as you move to the next tool.
As I said earlier, Quality control and ISO standards are ALMOST universal.
fred
 
  #24  
Old 12-27-02, 08:21 PM
Joe_F
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Fred:

You're missing the point. It's not just the tool or the product, it's the PRODUCT CYCLE.

Take an American built car. The steel comes from here. The tooling used to make it comes from here. It is engineered here. The tires are made here. The company supplying the interior (Lear or Prince) is here. The paint is made here (PPG in many cases), the glass is made here (AP Techno glass or PPG). The various vendors that supply the parts to make it happen are here.

Companies that provide subsequent service parts (likely the same vendors that made the original parts) are here. The electric company keeps that plant running, as opposed to it being closed and that production being overseas.

For ever car built, there are probably 10 to 20 jobs/related industries to that vehicle. If this is done in a foreign country, guess where the related industries go?

Rick:

If you don't have a choice that's one thing. In this case you do. Compressors are made here. IR, DeVilbiss (who supplies most of the Craftsman ones) are made here. Campbell Hausfeld---made here. Coleman--made here. There are choices!

Fred (again ):

The practices are NOT the same. I think you'd agree that most workers in this country enjoy a good life and are among the most affluent in the world. Do you think these other countries have the same labor laws, rights, thinking, theories as we do? Whether it's forced on companies or not, if you're going to blow the whistle, this is the country to express yourself and do it---for one the media will make a mock of the company. For another, the person will sue and win---that company will think twice before doing that again!

I'm with Cheese. I do look at what I buy. I just got back from Sears...bought a 13 piece wrench set---made here. I turned away a set of Craftsman pliers because the back said made in China. I usually shy away from imported stuff like that, because as Cheese said, the quality isn't there. It's readily apparent. Sears sells Chinese knockoffs to their tools called Companion...yet they do not warranty them! They DO warrranty the Craftsman of which close to 90% (I read this somewhere) are made in the USA.

Rick (again ):

You've fallen into the trap. The PROFITS go back to Japan and stay there. The only reason that Honda built plants here is because their volume is here and they got a 50 year tax break from the state of Ohio to build the Marysville plant. The profits go to Japan and stay there. The engineers that approve the Honda are Japanese. The suppliers they choose are mostly companies that have followed them here from Japan. Their headquarters are in Japan, and the think tanks are there, not here. The head Honcho of Honda lives in Japan, not the US. He's calling the shots to the US operations in Torrance.

I like MTD's logo/motto on their products: American Designed, American Engineered, American Built. The way to be.

Is there improvement needed in our products? Sure there is. But shame on us for not looking when we buy. I always do.
 
  #25  
Old 12-28-02, 04:58 AM
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Joe,
I'm not missing the point. I fully understand the trickle effect.

However, there are certain 'quality' items that are made in other countries. Remember this too, The entire quality process was imported from guess where - Japan.

I still agree with you. I look when I buy an item. And I'll even throw out a dig when someone tells me they bought a Mitsubishi.
"they made a good Zero, too"

fred
 
  #26  
Old 12-28-02, 05:49 AM
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I saw a TV show about tools that showed American workers making Ryobi saws, sanders and drills in a plant in KY or TN. For that reason, I don't feel bad about buying Ryobi.

American workers get paid to work. Same for the foreign car companies.

The profits do indeed go out of the country, and as I said, much of it is re-invested in American companies and real estate.

So, ten or fifty years from now everything will be owned by non-Americans. So what? 99.999% of Americans today don't own anything more than a house, a couple of cars and possibly a few tens of thousands of dollars of stock. It's a global economy now, and Americans have their fingers in a lot of foreign pies as well.

Jobs are much more important to me than ownership profits. That's why I choose to buy American MADE whenever I can rather than imports. I don't feel bad that a few foreign engineers are designing products made by thousands of Americans.

For the record, my wife and I drive American cars.
 
  #27  
Old 12-29-02, 10:30 AM
Joe_F
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Fred:

The Japanese quality process is a copy of ours and European processes, it is not their own, it has been simply modified. Japanese products for many years were considered junk and inferior until about 30 years ago. Often times, the Japanese products were copies of something else more so than an original design.

Rick:

You are buying into it . The profits go back to Japan and stay there. Very little of it in real money comes back here in the form of anything worthwhile. Other companies have only come here because they are suppliers to Honda and Toyota. Why did Honda build plants in Ohio over another state? It was merely which state danced the two step more than the next guy did.

Also, do you want the entire country to be owned by people that don't live or work here? Think about that . When you own something, you have power. The more we sell out, the more we relinquish that power. The more non Americans that own things in this country, the more that they will satisfy their own country's interest and people, not ours. Food for thought.

The American auto industry is a very, very important industry in this country. It's more than just a few foreign engineers designing things. You have to follow the whole process from where the money and designs originate to where the money winds up.

I'd put anything American I own against anything foreign. GM isn't the world's largest carmaker for nothing .
 
  #28  
Old 12-29-02, 11:19 AM
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Sorry Joe,
You are wrong. I'm not going to explain the Kaizen to you. You'll have to read the book like I did.

Hey - Happy New Year!!!
fred
 
  #29  
Old 12-29-02, 12:51 PM
Joe_F
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Fred:

Happy New Year.

Kaizen is nothing more than an extension of their communal and collectivist society. Great if you want to think like everyone else, but I don't, and most of us as Americans don't either. This is the beauty of our society---and our prosperity and diversity shine as a result of it. I'm well aware of their practices and way of life---I took Asian History as a minor when I was an undergraduate. Far from innovation with that. Typically, the Japanese are better imitators than they are innovators. Case in point: The VCR was engineered here, but Japanese companies get the credit for making them and marketing them. The Mazda Rotary engine is not theirs---based on Wankel, German technology. Infiniti and Lexus are afterthoughts to undercut the European luxury cars. A cheaper copy of the "real thing"

Hard working? Yes. Innovative? Hardly.

I've read their theories and such. If their systems were so great initially, why was it always a joke that Japanese products that came here early on were junk? It's only been the past 30 years or so that they have been regarded as a quality country.

Here's a good one. Some time back Takata Safety was in the spotlight in the US media for providing bad seat belts in Japanese cars. Takata's reply was, "Well Americans are sloppy and eat in their cars. They spill things down the buckles rendering them problematic". Testing showed the seatbelts were indeed defective and most carmakers issued recalls on them.

Funny that TRW and General Safety didn't have this problem during that same era (They supply the U.S. makers).

About two years ago, my coworker got into a tangle with a Subaru SVX on our way to work. The bumper of the Chevy caught the end of the Subaru, shattered the lamp, peeled the fender like a tin can and exploded the headlamp too. All from a 10 mile an hour hit. The damage to the 1988 Caprice? Not even a scratch . After we made sure everything was ok and no one was hurt (other guy's fault...he admitted it), we had a great laugh to ourselves. That guy was left with 1500 bucks in damage, my coworker. Nothing. Not a cent. We had to bend the Subaru's fender away so the kid could drive it. I was amazed at how poorly it was made.

Did Kaizen get credit for that one too ?

Sorry, I'll keep my American neighbors working in all industries thank you .
 
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