titanium drill bits

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Old 12-28-02, 06:46 PM
Snapper6356
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titanium drill bits

I got a set of titanium coated hss drill bits for christmas. They are clarke brand. 1/16-1/2 by 32nds. Does the titanium coating really of any benefit? I have never had any like this so I was hopping some of you had expierence with these.. Even if the bits don't last it came with a nice metal index to add in future bits as these break.. Thanks again....
 
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Old 12-30-02, 06:49 PM
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The titanium hss bit set is a nice present. I've actually never purchased any though. If I'm going to drill through steel a standard hss bit does the trick. If it dulls, it can be thrown away. I only use hss on metal. Any wood drilling I do is accomplished with either brad point bits(no wander), or Forstners.
I'll keep replacing hss bits until someday Santa brings me a Drill DR. to sharpen my hss bits.

fred
 
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Old 12-31-02, 04:49 AM
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Got a Drill Dr. for Christmas, fred. Only had a little time so far to test drive it, but it seems to do a very nice job on sharpening. Got the "500" model that does split-points and masonry and is ac powered. The procedure to do the sharpening looks and reads as somewhat daunting, but after doing a couple of bits to see how things work it's a breeze.
 
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Old 12-31-02, 05:33 PM
NutAndBoltKing
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Data from years of testing, both controlled and in the field, show that titanium coated drill bits lasted, on average, 6X longer than drill bits made of, or coated with, other conventional materials. Users commented that the titanium coated bits they tested retained sharp cutting edges and resisted dynamic heat friction and magnetism far better than other types.
 
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Old 12-31-02, 07:17 PM
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Interesting subject Guys!

the_tow_guy,
After you've used that nifty Drill Dr for a while, let us know if we should run out and get one.

NutAndBoltKing,
I did some extensive net searching (forums, magazines, reviews, etc) and really couldn't find exactly what you mentioned, except in one mfg's claim.

Here's some stuff I found -
a quote I found at the following site:
http://www.simplysailing.com/mast_raising.htm
" I ruined five drill bits including a $10 Bosch Titanium bit just to make one hole through one side of one tube. I visited a local industrial supply store and purchased two cobalt bits. They assured me I only needed one. They advised me to drill slowly and I used cutting oil to lubricate the bit. Running my drill at slow speed I could actually see the bit shaving bits of metal. All the remaining drilling was easily accomplished with only one bit."
Other finds -
These bits are coated with TITANIUM NITRIDE!

The titanium coating acts as a tool lube and protectant, keeping the bit sharper longer and running cooler.

TIN (Titanium Nitride) coated, an industrial
process that adds hardness and durability to cutting tools.

I'm almost tempted to go out and buy a few bits - hss, TiN, and cobalt and give them my own little test.
Until I post the results,
Happy New Year!!!!!!!!

fred
 
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Old 01-01-03, 06:15 AM
T
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Hello All

Its been my experience that overall Cobalt seemed to be the best. I have been in the trade for around 20 years or so and I think I've tried them all. With the coated bits, yes they hold up well for the initial use but once the coating is worn or ground off you are basically left with a HSS bit. Sometimes less depending on the manufacturer. Again I think the old rule applies " you get what you pay for". Of course, for the average homeowner, the set that Snapper received for Christmas should perform well...... Just my .02 worth.
 
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Old 01-01-03, 06:38 AM
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Hello Toni,
Everybody's money is good here!
That's about what I guessed with the coatings.
Most of my drilling is in wood, but I may try a Cobalt or two.
thanx,
fred
 
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Old 01-01-03, 08:15 AM
Big Crow
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Cool

Cobalt is normally used for harder steels (hence the slowing of the drilling speed and use of lubricants). TiN coated bits are usually for softer metals and, yes, once the coating has waned all you have left is a HSS bit. However, it will last longer because now you are left with only a sharp HSS bit when the coating is gone. The black oxide bits are also coated, but technology being what it is, the TiN is an improvement.
If you're just drilling wood you can use the bright HSS drill bits which should work out just fine.
Obviously, every drill bit is going to get dull from usage and cobalt, because of it's chemical makeup, is going to last significantly longer than a HSS, but at a MUCH greater cost.

I used to sell these. This is just an opinion. Take as you will.
 
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Old 01-01-03, 09:39 AM
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6X longer isn't just a manufactures claim.

Every manufacturer of tinanium products from drill bits to golf clubs to baseball bats to eyeglass frames to aerospace components to replacement hips, to you name it, will advance claims to the quality, toughness and longevity of their products; but the tinanium industry backed their seemingly outrageous claims on drill bits by funding tests that monitored bit performance and by publishing the results in TiN trade papers.

Drill bits of comparative speed, size, tip, pitch, flute, shank, etc and of nearly every material and coating, not just titanium, were distributed to and later collected from defense contractors, the military and trades users.

Bits tested in automated machines capable of performing day-long repetive bores with constant pressure and speed, were fitted with sensors and with time-torque-speed recorders to document use, and the tinanium bits used produced test results much higher than the final 6X average. Cost-value for the TiN bits tested in constant use application was high.

Intermitent usage tests, usually with handheld drill machines out in the field; used by trades, tehnicians aboard Navy carriers, at airfields and at RAD-b, research and development bases, experienced the lesser results lowering the average. Cost-value in field tests was lower too.

Besides the 6X average result the tests also showed that the TiN coated bits maintained microhardness and abrasion resistance levels.

Similar controlled testing is currently underway for the latest generation of constant use hollow core bits with lubrication ports - sponsored by the cobalt drill maufacturers.
 
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Old 01-01-03, 10:41 AM
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Big Crow and NutAndBoltKing,

Thanks for contributing additional info.
I wonder why I couldn't find any test results out here in cyberspace.

thx,
fred
 
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Old 01-01-03, 11:38 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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I don't know what the titanium "lobby" has out on the information highway, or if any articles and test results printed in their publications are available on line - I've never looked; but my local machine tool outlets have free brocheures from drill bit, tap, die, saw, fastener, lubrication, and you name it companies with tons of great information.

It's my opinion that drill bits are one of the most abused tools because they are seldom run at proper speed and lubrication, and are usually mismatched with the material being bored; so in most cases I think that it's the mechanic, not the tool that is the greater factor in wear and failure.

Two examples: 1. Back in 1969 I was given a previously used #7 high speed spiral two flute bit and a new 1/4 - 20 standard tap by my ironwoker foreman and sent to attach stair pans to steel stringers in a new building under construction. His bit and tap lasted the whole job, 3 - 4 months, and he told me to hold on to them when we were done. I put them in a plastic cigar tube, and have kept them in my worksite tool box since, using them countless times without a problem - most recently just last week. (No doubt I just jinxed myself and will break them next time out). 2. I had my son and grandson drill and pop rivet rain leaders and gutters together for me this past Fall season. They broke two bits on the job. Tool or mechanic?
 
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Old 01-01-03, 01:33 PM
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Interesting info.

NutAndBoltKing:

The claim of 6X the lifespan for Titanium bits in controlled use mirrors my experience with a large set of reasonable quality HSS bits I exclusively use on a drill press. Except for a couple that are MIA and couple of flute chips they have lasted for 8 years now.

The bits I use in the field are a different story.

As you say the abuse they suffer on the job is not what you would find in a shop environment.

Hey, ever make a 5/16" hole with a 1/4" bit?
 
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Old 01-04-03, 12:11 AM
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I've never tried a set of the TiN bits, but have used cobalt. The cobalt bits were very high $$ in comparison, but when you have to drill out grade 10 metric bolts, nothing else worked. The cobalt bits made quick work of the job, the other bits I had (HSS, black oxide, whatever I had in the box) didn't even start to make a hole. I don't see any advantage in using cobalt bits in wood though. HSS seems to be more than sufficient for that, and a little more forgiving if you get them in a bind. Seems like the cobalt bits are a bit more brittle, lol.
 
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Old 01-04-03, 06:37 AM
NutAndBoltKing
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Smile TiN Wrench and Tool Sticker Shock

I was at my machine tool outlet yesterday and took a peep at the titanium box-open end combo wenches and hex keys being marketed. Okay; lighter, corrosion proof, non-magnetic and nicely made, but talk about sticker shock ....
 
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Old 01-04-03, 07:21 AM
mikejmerritt
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I have had the same experience as cheese with the cobalt bits. When nothing else will touch high grade metals a slow spinning cobalt bit will go right through......Mike
 
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