Questions on storing compressor

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Old 12-31-02, 09:30 AM
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Questions on storing compressor

Santa gave me a 22 gal husky air compressor and the instructions are not clear on storing the unit. If it will go unused for a month or more, would you suggest depressurizing it and leaving the drain petcock open?

Also, should the hose be disconnected from the compressor to avoid water build-up in the hose? Or could I just bleed air through it on startup using a blower tool prior to an air tool? (I threaded the air hose to the output port so it is more of a permanent connection than a quick-connect.)
 
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Old 12-31-02, 05:39 PM
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teddymines:

It really won't make much difference if there is pressure on it or not.

The compressor head has an unloader on it and the pressure does not stay on the head for very long.
Once the pressure is reileved on the head, a check valve keeps the air from bleeding back through the compressor.

Also if you do happen to get moisture accumulating in the tank blowing out the hose before using an air tool won't do much good.

You need to have a filter installed on the compressor outlet to protect your air tools.
 
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Old 01-01-03, 08:17 AM
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Along with what Greg said..

Do yourself a favor and buy an auto-drain. You can get one for about $50, and install it in place of the petcock, release the pressure first!! This will keep the tank drained of water for you, because you will forget/neglect to do it, and eventually the petcock will seal itself shut anyway.

I always release the pressure on the hoses when I'm done uses them, much as I turn the water off when I'm done with the garden hose. You do need an inline filter and water seperator (even with a drain, the sudden release of pressure will cause water vapor to form). If you use a lot of air tools (and ONLY air tools) get an inline oiler, otherwise, just put a few drops of oil in the tool before you use it.
 
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Old 01-01-03, 10:19 AM
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teddymines:

An auto-drain would be a good investment as Pendragon says, as long as the compressor is not in freezing conditions.

You have to be carefull when using an oiler that you dedicate the oiled air lines to air tools only.

I had one but found it was too much of a pain keeping track of hoses. Would get oil spots if I grabbed the wrong hose to dust something.
I get by quite nicely giving an air tool a drop of oil before using.

Also a tip on air tool maintenance:
When I finish a major project with high air tool time I flush the tool with a large amount of WD-40 through the air fitting.
Let the tool run for a while to blow it all out and then finish with a couple drops of oil and then let it run again to circulate the oil.

It's amazing how much junk comes out when you hit it with WD.
 
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Old 01-02-03, 09:39 AM
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Thanks for all the advice. I really like the advice of flushing the tool with wd-40 after heavy use. An in-line filter sounds like my next major purchase, then maybe an auto-drain if I find myself using the compressor often enough that manually draining is too much of a pain.
 
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Old 01-02-03, 10:01 AM
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teddymines:

You can get some really nice pressure regulator/filter combinations for not much more than just a filter if yours doesn't have one.

When shopping for a regulator you can check the spec's on it to make sure it will work at the required CFM to match or exceed your compressors's capacity.
Sometimes you will have a choice of 1/4", 3/8", 1/2" or larger.
Usually the larger fitting sizes have a larger capacity and the 3/8" and up would work well for you.
Separate filter regulator set-ups are better than the all in one units.

Just use an increaser to connect it to your comp if the ftgs don't match.

Another tip:
When connecting the regulator to the compressor tank try to install another quick-connect after the filter but before the regulator.
This will allow unimpeded air flow for those high demand tools.
 
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