compressor/air tools

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  #1  
Old 04-03-03, 09:17 PM
stooge
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compressor/air tools

I'm looking into purchasing a compressor and air tools. I'd like to pick up a framing nailer, trim nailer and some other tools (maybe ratchet, impact wrench, etc.). From a previous post and some investigation of my own, I'm looking to go with Bostitch nailers if possible (currently surfing ebay). Porter Cable looks like my second choice for nailers (Paslode any good for framers?).

I saw a recommendation on a previous post to go with a 15 ga nailer for all-purpose trim work. Is this OK for all types of trim (base, casing, crown, etc.) or is it too heavy for thinner trim? I usually go with 4d or 6d nails the old fashion way, not sure what 15 ga is in comparison.

As for compressors, I might have a great deal on a oil-less unit, however, I've read posts here that say to avoid oil-less units. Can I get by with one? I guess cons for oil-less units are noisier and less service life. Also, in looking at the smaller compressors (pancakes and dual tank models), I'm concerned about air capacity for future use. I'm not sure how much air I might need to run a sprayer or chisel or something like that. Any comments are appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-03-03, 11:57 PM
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Well…it all depends. Yes an oils less compressor will work, but for who long? I prefer to buy a good tool and only buy it once. For home use I would look for a compressor that will supply about 6cfm @ 90PSI with at least a 40 gallon tank. This will allow you to handle most air tools with resonable cycling of the compressor.
 
  #3  
Old 04-04-03, 10:59 PM
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A compressor can be the central hub of a shop. When you buy different tools and accessories to use with it, you become more dependent on its reliability and capabilities. If you buy one that is more than you need now, it may only be adequate 6 months from now, when you begin to realize how useful it is. I agree that oilless ones should be avoided unless you don't plan to use it often, or need to rely on it. I also agree that 6cfm @ 90psi should be the minimum requirement. 30 or 40 gallons would be a good place to start looking. 60 is nice. The larger the tank, the less cycling the motor will do.
 
  #4  
Old 04-05-03, 04:55 PM
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I have an airless about 1 year old, still works great. I agree with your choice of nailers. I use mine a couple of times a month. The air less is noicey but think everyone is to critical about them.
 
  #5  
Old 04-05-03, 04:58 PM
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I like the 15 gauge nailer but bought a 16. I have done trim and doors with it. It is fine for me. I love my nailers.
 
  #6  
Old 04-05-03, 06:14 PM
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Hey michaelshortt!
How do you get enough pressure in an airless compressor for a nailer to work?

Oilless compressors do get a bad rap around here and maybe undeservedly so.
They are not a piece of equipment for extended use, but the price gets people in the air game that maybe otherwise wouldn't.
If the thing quits before it's time, a person can then decide what use a better compressor would be.

BTW, I went to the city a week ago and visited a liquidation store.
They had two big bins full of near new air tanks from Campbell Hausfield oiless compressors.
I bought one for my latest compressor project and the tank is quite heavy, but I guess the compressors didn't stand up.

One interesting thing printed on the tank is a duty cycle rating which I've never seen on an air compressor before.
It says 150 sec on, 350 sec off!!!
 
  #7  
Old 04-06-03, 08:41 AM
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It has had plenty of pressure and volume for my nailers. They only require about 90psi and mine compressor cuts off at 120. I will provide my compressor specs later, but I think they are pretty standard.
 
  #8  
Old 04-06-03, 01:38 PM
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Red face My dumb joke!

You said airless compressor instead of oilless.

I bought a cheap 1 1/4" by 18 guage nailer a while ago to see if it would be usefull and I've put a couple of thousand brads through it and it's still going strong.
I paid $29.00 CDN for it which is only about $18.00 US.
 
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Old 04-06-03, 03:22 PM
stooge
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Good dialogue we have going here fellas, thanks for your input. Since I didn't get the deal on the oil-less I was looking at, I think I'll go with an oil-lubed model. I'm with WeldGod, I like to buy a solid tool once and not have to replace it or worry about it. I have to say, I'm surprised at how many oil-less models there are out there right now after shopping around some. I think they actually outnumber the oil-lube units.

I will take the suggestions about 6 cfm @ 90 psi. This is important because I'm sure I'll expand my air tool arsenal later. As for nailers, I still can't decide between 15 ga and 16 ga finish nailer. Would 15 ga be too heavy for some applications. For example, I'll likely build a bar, shelving units/built-ins, baseboard, crown, casing.
 
  #10  
Old 04-06-03, 05:41 PM
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stooge:

I think the popularity of oilless compressors is giving people a taste of how usefull a compressor really is.
Too bad they don't research first as what they pay for a cheap one would be a good down payment on something decent.
 
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Old 04-09-03, 09:44 AM
Carroll B
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I bought a Paslode 18 ga finishing nailer from some place on the internet. I think they were in Lousiana. Paid $99 including the shipping. I used it to install all the paneling and trim on my porch. Will take up to a 2.5 in nail. I like the light weight of this unit. Did learn one thing. Never use your left hand to determine where to place the nailer with your right hand. You wouldn't believe how fast one of those nails can go through your finger nail. I use 2 HP compresor rated at 6.9 CFM @ 90 PSI. If I had it to do over I'd try to get one rated at 11 CFM or more. Some of the air tools like the DA sander and air cutoff tool use more air then my compressor can supply.
 
  #12  
Old 04-09-03, 10:11 AM
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An 18 gauge that shoots a 2-1/2 brad"? What Paslode model # would that be?
 
  #13  
Old 04-09-03, 11:08 AM
skillet*
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I have a Paslode T200-F18 (18 guage that is great for finish work. I chose this one because it shoots 5/8'' to 2''. The longer nails can be used for thne outer edges of the casing where it is thicker. Great multi purpose gun.

Daren
 
  #14  
Old 04-09-03, 12:25 PM
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I'm looking at getting another nailer because my cheap brad nailer only goes to 1 1/4" and a little heavier and longer nail would be better.
It seems that 18 g only goes to 2" while 16g goes to 2 1/2".
 
  #15  
Old 04-09-03, 12:55 PM
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For trim work, I have a DuoFast 15 gauge that shoots a 2-1/2" brad but don't use it very much mainly because I also have a PorterCable 16 gauge that shoots a 2-1/2" brad. I have a Bostitch 18 gauge that shoots up to a 2" and an Airy 18 gauge that shoots up to a 1-9/16" brad. The Airy is very nice, just sort of spits them out with no recoil to speak of and has a dual trigger rather than a contact enabling mechanism. I also have a 23 gauge headless pinner. The ones that get the most usage are the Bostitch 18 gauge, the Airy 18 gauge and the PorterCable 16 gauge. As you can see, I don't have a great deal of brand loyalty. I originally had a PorterCable 18 gauge (up to 2" brad) but returned it after a couple of weeks in favor of the Bostitch. For framing, I have a Makita clipped-head stick nailer, a Bostitch framing coil nailer, a Bostitch utility (fence and siding) coil nailer, a Bostitch 16 gauge 1/2" crown stapler, a Hilti 1" crown stapler (roofing), a PorterCable 1/4" crown stapler, a DuoFast corrugated fastener gun and a generic palm nailer. I'm still using a 15 year old Makita 2 h.p. oilless compressor that is terribly loud but won't seem to wear out so I can get something quieter.
 
  #16  
Old 04-09-03, 05:16 PM
stooge
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Hey tx, sounds like you have too many nailers, how 'bout sending some my way? I'm still debating 15 ga vs. 16 ga, is this much of a difference or should I not worry about it? Or just go with a 16 ga and use longer nails for more holding power?

Also, anyone have any comments on oil-less nailers, will they hold up as well as normal lubricated nailers? I'm still surfing ebay for nailers and I'm amazed at what people will pay for used tools.
 
  #17  
Old 04-09-03, 05:38 PM
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15 year old oil-less, they don't last very long. LOL
 
  #18  
Old 04-10-03, 05:00 AM
texdiyguy
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As I said before, I don't use my 15 gauge much (usually only for hanging pre-hung doors - nailing through the jamb to the jack stud). But the 16 gauge seems to do the job just as well. The main advantage (to me) is that the 16 gauge seldom will cause a piece of trim to split. It (the 16 gauge) is also quieter with much less recoil.
 
  #19  
Old 04-10-03, 09:27 AM
stooge
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Thanks tex, that settles it...16 ga it is!
 
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