Router?

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  #1  
Old 04-25-03, 08:11 AM
MichaelJP
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Router?

I am pretty new with routers.

I am thought I had seen bits that could be used to cut wood like a jigsaw would, meaning scroll work. So if anyone could give me a name of a bit that would do that, thanks.

I am using a Makita 1hp 1/4" router on a Craftsman table. I saw a Craftsman 2hp 1/2" and 1/4" router for about the same price but it's RPM was lower.

Should I return this one form the 2hp? I haven't really done anything with it yet so a return is not a problem.


Here are the product links so you can see,
Craftsman, 15,000 to 25,000 RPM
http://www.sears.com/sr/product/summ...id=00926834000

Makita, 30,000 RPM the one I bought
http://www.makita.com/Tools_Item_View.asp?ID=84

Thanks for the help,
Michael
 
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Old 04-25-03, 09:47 AM
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Michael:

I too am a student of the router, but from what I've learned so far I would have to say that the Craftsman one would be more usefull. The variable speed option and the fact that it can take 1/2" bits is a definite plus. The speed of a router should be matched to the size of the bit. Usually the larger the bit the slower the speed you would use. The router speed should correspond to the correct tip speed of the bit. The bigger the bit the faster the tip speed at the same rpm.

One type of scroll bit:
<img src="http://www.leevalley.com/images/item/woodworking/router/15j0614s1.jpg">

More here:http://www.leevalley.com/wood/index....D=&ccurrency=1
 
  #3  
Old 04-25-03, 10:29 AM
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One observation about 1/2" routers is that you will soon learn that the money is in the bits, not the router. Get a good router, and take care of the bits.
 
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Old 04-25-03, 02:01 PM
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Chris,

You sure are right about the price of bits!
I am tuning up my shop in preparation for some projects and have in the last couple of months bought; $90.00 CDN for a 15 pc bit set on a Sears half price sale, a $50.00 tenon bit, a $72.00 combination rail and stile bit that I will likely abandon as I don't have the patience to reshim each time I change profiles. I also had to buy a $20.00, 5/8" straight bit that wasn't included in my set. Not to mention a small collection that I already had.

Anyone reading this post be warned: Routers are a disease!
 
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Old 04-25-03, 02:28 PM
MichaelJP
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One more question.

I bought a panel pilot bit, set didn't have one.
Yet when I tried to cut the wood began to smoke instead of cut.

Anyone have a site on how to use routers?

Thanks for all the help.
Michael
 
  #6  
Old 04-25-03, 03:11 PM
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Sounds as if the bit speed is too slow, the cut rate or movement of the router is too slow, the bit was not inserted all the way for the cutting edge to engage the wood, or the bit is dull. Is is high speed steel or carbide?

This looks like a good book. Taunton Press is top quality with its books and such.

http://www.taunton.com/store/pages/070550.asp
 
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Old 04-25-03, 04:13 PM
MichaelJP
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Yes it is high speed steel bit.

I'll check into that, thanks.
 
  #8  
Old 04-25-03, 04:19 PM
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Router bits are the only thing for which I have a custom holder. I built a case for them. I has a place for a dessicant tablet. I figure that I have $2000 worth of 1/2" carbide bits. You could carry them off with one hand. Well, you would have to negotiate with the dogs, first.
 
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Old 04-26-03, 10:53 AM
millertime
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Originally posted by chfite
Router bits are the only thing for which I have a custom holder. I built a case for them. I has a place for a dessicant tablet. I figure that I have $2000 worth of 1/2" carbide bits. You could carry them off with one hand. Well, you would have to negotiate with the dogs, first.


2 grand? (that 3 grand canadian). HOLY $&*#
 
  #10  
Old 04-26-03, 10:49 PM
NutAndBoltKing
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IMHO the FIRST factor to be considered in any router purchase, exchange, or upgrade is the collet.

Why the collet first and then other considerations like price, horsepower, or amps etc second? Think about the chock on a drill or a drill press. The chock spins, and the pressure applied to it forces the end of the bit downward into the workpiece. On a router the collet spins, but the pressure applied forces the side of the bit against the workpiece - which is a totally different and much greater stress on the router collet than on the drill chock.

Collets on low end inexpensive routers are usually 'split arbors' and IMO aren't desirable. Thet're not removable for replacement or service because the socket half is actually the end of the armature of the motor. That may not matter for the new woodworker or occasional user, but a serious woodworker and steady router user would not want that type.

IMHO the collet should be the first item considered.
 
  #11  
Old 04-27-03, 04:53 PM
MichaelJP
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Made the exchange.

I like the craftsman much better.
A few things I like,

1) Much more solid feel
2) Removable collet for 1/2" and 1/4"
3) Switch in handle is much more convenient
4) Speed adjustment is very nice 10,000 RPM adjustment range

I know I am new to routers but I like this one much more than the Makita.

I hate the routing table I bought. I plan to make my own.


Michael
 
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